About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Migraine Headaches Might Co-exist
Advertisement

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Migraine Headaches Might Co-exist

Font : A-A+

Highlights:
  • About 7 or 8 out of every 100 people experience PTSD at some point in their lives
  • Migraines can possibly co-occur with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Genes linked to both PTSD and migraine were engaged in longevity regulating pathways

Research revealed for the first time that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and migraines could co-occur.

A recent research published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience reported that PTSD and migraine headaches might include common genes and pathways to occur simultaneously. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is a condition that occurs to someone after a shocking or traumatic event.

Advertisement


As per the National Centre for PTSD reports, about 7 or 8 out of every 100 people experience PTSD at some point in their lives. Other conditions like anxiety, depression, migraines, and recurrent nightmares appear concurrently with this disorder. Little has been known about the genes involved in causing the co-morbid condition of PTSD and migraines. The study sought to explore more about this co-occurrence using monozygotic twin subjects.

"Our results suggest that common genes and signaling pathways are involved in PTSD and migraine, and this might explain why PTSD and migraine can co-occur frequently," said Prof Divya Mehta, senior author of the study.

Probing Deep into the Co-occurrence

The researchers divided six pairs of monozygotic twins as a group where one of each pair had PTSD and 15 pairs of monozygotic twins as another group in which one of each pair had migraine. They used the peripheral blood samples from the subjects and validated 11 candidate genes, including DOCK2, DICER1, and ADCYAP1.
Advertisement

The outcomes of the epigenome-wide analyses revealed that 132 specific sites in 99 genes were associated with PTSD and migraines in the samples of participants in the second group. The genes related to PTSD were participating in high numbers in vascular smooth muscle, axon guidance, and oxytocin signaling pathway. In contrast, genes linked to both PTSD and migraine headaches were engaged in AMPK signaling and longevity regulating pathways.

What Does the Study Add up to?

The findings of this novel study suggest the role of shared environmental risk factors that could act on the genes for both PTSD and migraines. Further, it emphasizes the need for changes to be made in therapies to manage co-morbidities like these.

Metha concluded: "For co-occurring disorders such as PTSD and migraines, once we know which common genes are implicated in both disorders, we can develop new therapeutics to target these, thereby reducing symptoms and curing both."

Reference:
  1. Bainomugisa CK, Sutherland HG, Parker R, Mcrae AF, Haupt LM, Griffiths LR, Heath A, Nelson EC, Wright MJ, Hickie IB, Martin NG, Nyholt DR and Mehta D (2021) Using Monozygotic Twins to Dissect Common Genes in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Migraine. Front. Neurosci. 15:678350. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2021.678350


Source: Medindia

Citations   close

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    Saisruthi Sankaranarayanan. (2021, June 24). Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Migraine Headaches Might Co-exist. Medindia. Retrieved on Sep 27, 2022 from https://www.medindia.net/news/healthinfocus/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd-and-migraine-headaches-might-co-exist-201897-1.htm.

  • MLA

    Saisruthi Sankaranarayanan. "Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Migraine Headaches Might Co-exist". Medindia. Sep 27, 2022. <https://www.medindia.net/news/healthinfocus/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd-and-migraine-headaches-might-co-exist-201897-1.htm>.

  • Chicago

    Saisruthi Sankaranarayanan. "Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Migraine Headaches Might Co-exist". Medindia. https://www.medindia.net/news/healthinfocus/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd-and-migraine-headaches-might-co-exist-201897-1.htm. (accessed Sep 27, 2022).

  • Harvard

    Saisruthi Sankaranarayanan. 2021. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Migraine Headaches Might Co-exist. Medindia, viewed Sep 27, 2022, https://www.medindia.net/news/healthinfocus/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd-and-migraine-headaches-might-co-exist-201897-1.htm.

Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Anemia among Indian Women and Children Remains a Cause of Concern- National Family Health Survey-5
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
Dietary Factors Responsible for Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) Production and Hair Loss
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Migraine Palpitations And Arrhythmias Stress Relief Through Alternative Medicine Stress and the Gender Divide Andropause / Male Menopause Headache / Cephalgia Heart Attack- Lifestyle Risks Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Is Your Man Moody? Tired All The Time 

Most Popular on Medindia

Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Drug Interaction Checker The Essence of Yoga Daily Calorie Requirements Blood Pressure Calculator Selfie Addiction Calculator Color Blindness Calculator Noscaphene (Noscapine) A-Z Drug Brands in India
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Migraine Headaches Might Co-exist Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests