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Gone in 63 Minutes- a Short Lifespan for Everyday Tranquility!

by Tanya Thomas on September 6, 2008 at 9:06 AM
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Gone in 63 Minutes- a Short Lifespan for Everyday Tranquility!

Peace of mind- that's a rare commodity nowadays. What with TV, Internet and the ubiquitous mobile phone that has invaded our lives, there's hardly anytime to sit still, relax and watch the world pass by.

Now, a new research claims that thanks to all this "media noise" and ruckus of everyday life, the average person gets only 63 minutes of peace and quiet in 24 hours. That's roughly an hour of personal time in an entire day!

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According to findings from media researchers M-Lab, one in three adults do not even have an hour of rest while at home and more than one-in-five (22 per cent) have 30 minutes or less.

From those surveyed, almost a third of people (32 per cent) said they woke up to the sound of either their television or radio and nearly three-quarters (71 per cent) said listening to the television or radio or using their computer was the last thing they did before going to sleep at night.
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Graham Williams, M-Lab director, said he was not surprised that the average person had just 60 minutes of media silence, but rather that they had any time at all.

"I don't think it's that surprising. I am more surprised there are people who have this golden hour where they do nothing," the Telegraph quoted him, as saying.

"People multi-task. I think people usually have two bits of media going at the same time.

"Back in the day, the phone was usually in the hall but because phones are mobile now people can move around, people can watch TV and use the phone. I think it's the way media has become portable.

"Five or six years ago people would go into a room and take a phone call, you now have to tell people to turn their phone off, people wouldn't take a call in a meeting now people do it.

"I think it's the way people work and I think people accept it. A newspaper would have previously got one golden moment when the reader would sit by themselves and read it.

"Nowadays I watch people on the train they have a walkman on and read a paper at the same time," he said.

He added: "For some people, background noise provides a vital sense of security and companionship but for others preserving a bit of quiet time for ourselves or to spend with our families is getting increasingly difficult."

Source: ANI
TAN/M
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