About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Give Proof for Upgrading Mobile Device Technology in Health

by Savitha C Muppala on February 13, 2013 at 11:43 PM
Font : A-A+

 Give Proof for Upgrading Mobile Device Technology in Health

Despite the hundreds of pilot studies using mobile health—also known as 'mHealth'', which describe medical and public health practice supported by mobile devices— there is insufficient evidence to inform the widespread implementation and scale-up of this technology, according to international researchers writing in this week's PLOS Medicine.

There are over 6 billion mobile phone subscribers and 75% of the world has access to a mobile phone leading health care providers, researchers, and national governments to be optimistic about the opportunities mobile health has to offer. However, the authors led by Mark Tomlinson from Stellenbosch University in South Africa, question the evidence supporting the scale up of mHealth.

Advertisement

The authors say: "In some ways, mobile technology has a magical appeal for those interested in global public health over and above the advantages that have been proven with good evidence."

They continue: "Part of this magical promise is that mobile technologies may solve one of the most difficult problems facing global health efforts—that of structural barriers to access."
Advertisement

However, according to the authors while enthusiasm for effective mHealth interventions in sub-Saharan Africa is high, little is known about their efficacy or effectiveness.

They say: "The current wave of mHealth interventions are the equivalent of black boxes. Each small entrepreneur or researcher includes whatever bells and whistles that their funding allows in an attempt to demonstrate efficacy."

The authors argue that potential innovative research designs such as multi-factorial strategies, randomized controlled trials, and data farming may provide this evidence base and make several recommendations for the way forward.

The authors also argue that major donors could invest in creating a robust set of standards and a platform that can inform and support local adaptation of mHealth applications. The standardized features of the platform could then be available to all local technicians committed to improving the health of their local communities.

The authors conclude: "We also believe a global strategy for programmatic examination of the optimal features of the mobile platforms is needed."



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
First-Ever Successful Pig-To-Human Kidney Transplantation
World Osteoporosis Day 2021 -
Spirituality and Mental Health
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


Recommended Reading
Mobile Health Technology
In a report submitted by the WHO it was found that eight in 10 countries are making use of mobile .....
Latest Medical Gadgets On Display At 'Digital Health Summit'
Technology companies showed off the latest innovations on the digital health care front at the ......
India's Mobile Healthcare
India's global mobile health technology faces rapid growth in the next couple of years....

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use