Floods May Up Skin Infection Risk in Humans

by Adeline Dorcas on  March 5, 2019 at 2:12 PM Environmental Health
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Floods may increase the risk of skin infections among humans, warns a skin expert.

Skin and soft tissue infections can develop when injured skin is exposed to floodwaters containing sewage, chemicals, and other pollutants, HealthDay reported.
Floods May Up Skin Infection Risk in Humans
Floods May Up Skin Infection Risk in Humans

In particular, natural disasters like tsunamis and hurricanes can cause major soil disruption that leads to the release of unusual infectious organisms.

"The health implications for people exposed to floodwaters are staggering and include a wide variety of dermatologic (skin) issues, such as wound infections, contact dermatitis and even electrical injuries from downed power lines," said Justin Bandino, Assistant Professor at the San Antonio Military Medical Centre in the US.

"In cases when malnourished patients have not had access to food and clean water, even a small, superficial cut that has been exposed to these infectious organisms can result in a potentially dangerous infection," he said.

Animals and insects also pose risks to flood victims. Bites from domesticated and non-domesticated animals increase as flooding forces them to compete with people for space in dry areas, said Bandino.

In addition, stagnant floodwaters provide breeding areas for mosquitoes, which can lead to outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases like Zika or malaria.

One will need a basic first-aid kit that includes supplies for cleaning, covering and treating minor wounds, as well as insect repellent, Bandino suggested.

Further, keeping on hand a basic survival kit that includes non-perishable food and water supplies is essential to help reduce the chance of malnourishment and dehydration, which both increase the risk of infection.

"Tsunamis, hurricanes, floods and other emergency situations can aggravate existing dermatologic conditions, such as eczema or psoriasis. When possible, take any medications for current skin conditions with you during an evacuation, along with other basic first-aid supplies; this can greatly reduce the opportunity for a flare," said Bandino.

Also, visiting a board-certified dermatologist for skin-related problems is advisable, the expert added.

Source: IANS

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