About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Filipino Children In California Vulnerable To Kawasaki Disease

by Gopalan on May 8, 2011 at 7:05 AM
Font : A-A+

 Filipino Children In California Vulnerable To Kawasaki Disease

The Filipino children in the San Diego county in California seem to be more vulnerable than others to the Kawasaki disease (KD), a new study shows.

The disease inflames the medium-sized arteries and affects many organs in the body including the skin, mucous membranes, lymph nodes, blood vessel walls, and most importantly, the heart. Without timely treatment, a child will take longer to recover and 25% of untreated children may develop heart disease.

Advertisement

While children of all ethnicities can contract Kawasaki disease (KD), a study led by researchers at the Kawasaki Disease Research Center at the University of California, San Diego and Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego finds that Filipino children with KD are at a higher risk for inflammation of the blood vessels of the heart than those of other Asian and non-Asian backgrounds.

Nearly 24 percent of Filipino children with KD in San Diego County were found to have aneurysms compared to 10.5 percent of children of other Asian descent.
Advertisement

The study appears in the May 6, 2011 issue of Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

"Filipinos make up the largest Asian subgroup in San Diego County, yet there are no available reports of KD in Filipino children," said Adriana H. Tremoulet, MD, MAS, assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics, UC San Diego School of Medicine. "With the results of this study, our call to action is for medical providers to have a heightened awareness of KD so patients can be treated promptly and the risk of heart disease is minimized. Parents, especially those of Filipino descent, need to know the signs and symptoms of KD and when to contact their physician."

Clinical signs of KD include fever, rash, red eyes, swollen glands in the neck, swollen and red hands and feet and red, cracked lips. If left untreated, one in four children will develop permanent damage to their blood vessels and heart.

The team analyzed 345 patients in San Diego Country who had KD. They collected clinical and demographic data across three groups — Filipino, non-Filipino Asians and others.

"Our findings indicate there may be genetic reasons why there is a higher attack rate of KD and aneurysms in Filipino children," said Tremoulet. "Our next steps are to increase awareness of KD in the Filipino community and to understand the genetic reasons why Filipino children are at higher risk of more severe KD."

Funding was provided in part by grants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institution and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.



Source: Medindia
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
Toothache
World AIDS Day 2021 - End Inequalities, End AIDS
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Kawasaki Disease Height and Weight-Kids 

Recommended Reading
Kawasaki Disease
Kawasaki disease affects the children that involve the skin, mouth and blood vessels. It can be ......
Autoimmune Disorders
Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system fails to recognize the body as 'self' and attacks ...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use