About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Fight Against Drug-resistant TB Boosted by Newer Antibiotics

by Rajashri on October 17, 2008 at 1:14 PM
Font : A-A+

 Fight Against Drug-resistant TB Boosted by Newer Antibiotics

In what could be a major breakthrough for medical science, scientists have revealed that a new class of antibiotics shows great promise in treating drug-resistant tuberculosis and other diseases caused by bacteria.

Researchers in the October 17th issue of the medical journal "Cell" said they discovered three naturally-occurring antibiotic compounds that can be used to create new medications, which can be administered to unleash "a kind of chemical warfare against other bacteria."

Advertisement

The breakthrough holds special promise for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB), a disease that is carried by one in three people in the world and which is proving increasingly resistant to today's antibiotics, scientists said.

The new antibiotic class not also promises treatment that could be significantly shorter than existing antibiotic regimens, which can last as long as a half-year.
Advertisement

"The Holy Grail in TB therapy is to reduce the course of therapy from six months to two weeks - to make treatment of TB like treatment of other bacterial infections," said Richard Ebright, lead researcher at Rutgers University's Howard Hughes Institute, which conducted the study.

"With a six-month course of therapy for a disease that is largely centered in the Third World, the logistical problems of administering therapy over space and time make eradication a nonstarter," said Ebright said.

"If there were a two-week course of therapy, the logistics would be manageable, and the disease could be eradicated," he said.

The breakthrough comes at a time when roughly a quarter of all deaths worldwide result from bacteria-borne diseases but with such pathogens increasingly resistant to available antibiotics.

"For six decades, antibiotics have been our bulwark against bacterial infectious diseases," said Ebright.

"Now, this bulwark is collapsing. There is an urgent need for new antibiotic compounds and practical new targets."

Source: AFP
RAS/SK
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
Toothache
World AIDS Day 2021 - End Inequalities, End AIDS
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Tuberculosis AIDS/HIV Silicosis Screening Tests for Tuberculosis Antibiotics 

Recommended Reading
Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily affects the lung. It may spread to ......
TB in 9,000yr-old Skeletons
Detailed analyses of the bones excavated from a 9000 year-old Pre-Pottery Neolithic village, ......
World Leaders Urged to Step Up Fight Against Pneumonia
Pneumococcal disease, one of the world's leading causes of death and serious illness, must be ......
AIDS/HIV
"AIDS is an epidemic disease, a potentially preventable, deadly infection for which there is no cure...
Antibiotics
Antibiotics are among the most used and abused medications. This article explains some general featu...
Screening Tests for Tuberculosis
Tuberculin skin test and Interferon – Release Assays are tests used to screen for tuberculosis....
Silicosis
Silicosis is a lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline free silica dust. It is characterise...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use