About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Fetal Cells in Women -A Protective Effect Against Breast Cancer..

by Hannah Punitha on October 1, 2007 at 4:58 PM
Font : A-A+

Fetal Cells in Women -A Protective Effect Against Breast Cancer..

The findings, published in the Oct. 1 issue of Cancer Research, add to the Jekyll and Hyde characteristics of fetal microchimerism, or FMc, which has been found to be both detrimental and beneficial to women's health.

In this latest prospective study, scientists V.K. Gadi, M.D., Ph.D. and J. Lee Nelson, M.D., examined the blood of 82 women post-pregnancy, 35 of whom had had breast cancer. They looked for male DNA in the blood, presuming it was present due to a prior pregnancy. Fetal microchimerism (FMc) was found significantly more often in healthy women than women with a history of breast cancer, 43 percent versus 14 percent respectively. The women concluded that FMc may contribute to reduction of breast cancer based on the hypothesis that residual fetal cells may provide immune surveillance of malignant cells in the mother. They caution that further studies are needed to confirm the theory.

Advertisement

"To our knowledge, the current results provide the first indication that FMc could impart a protective effect against breast cancer," Gadi said.

Prior research into FMc, some of it performed at the Hutchinson Center, indicates that while the presence of fetal cells in women may confer immune protection and promote cell repair, such cells also may be harbingers of some autoimmune diseases.
Advertisement

Two observations provided a rationale for the study hypothesis of the potential beneficial role of fetal cells, according to the authors. It is well established that women who have given birth have a lower risk of breast cancer. And, allogeneic (from another individual) stem-cell transplants are used to treat many types of blood cancers by replacing a diseased immune system with a healthy one .

Additionally, fetal cells are commonly found in the circulating blood of healthy women who have given birth. Fetal cells represent a naturally acquired source of allogeneic immune cells; in prior studies the prevalence of T, B, natural-killer (NK) and antigen-presenting cells of fetal origin in healthy women ranged from 30 percent to 70 percent, depending on the cell type. The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and Amgen Inc.

Source: Eurekalert
SPH
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Top 7 Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene
Healthy and Safer Thanksgiving 2021
Long-Term Glycemic Control - A Better Measure of COVID-19 Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Mastitis Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Breasts - Structures and Types Breast Lumps Breast Lumps-Screening Breast Enhancement Oil 
Recommended Reading
Breast Enhancement Oil
Breasts contain mammary glands which produce and secrete milk for feeding and nourishing babies. Tho...
Breast Lumps
Most breast lumps are caused by hormonal changes in a woman and may not be cancerous. Common causes ...
Breast Lumps-Screening
Breast lumps must never be neglected but instead be subjected to medical examination to rule out ......
Breasts - Structures and Types
Different stages of breast development in women and an in-depth look at the breast/bust and its ......
Mastitis
Mastitis is a common cause of tenderness, swelling and pain in breast, owing to inflammation in the ...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use