About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Fatal Genetic Diseases can be Diagnosed by Blood-Clotting Agent

by Kathy Jones on February 5, 2011 at 6:33 PM
Font : A-A+

 Fatal Genetic Diseases can be Diagnosed by Blood-Clotting Agent

A protein involved in blood clotting can be used to diagnose and subsequently monitor the treatment of a group of childhood genetic diseases, University of Manchester scientists have shown.

In the study, published in the Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, the researchers were able to show that the clotting agent, heparan cofactor II/Thrombin (HCII/T) complex, could be used as a 'biomarker', or biological tell, in individuals with mucopolysaccharide (MPS) diseases.

Advertisement

MPS diseases are severe metabolic conditions caused by a genetic defect that affects the body's ability to break down complex sugars in cells and the bloodstream. The conditions result in a range of symptoms from abnormal skeletal development to mental decline and even premature death depending on the type of sugars built up in the body.

Treatment options have been limited but recent advances whereby the missing or faulty enzyme that breaks down the sugars is replaced artificially in affected individuals has made the need for an accurate diagnostic tool for these diseases more pressing.
Advertisement

Lead researcher Dr Brian Bigger, from Manchester's MPS Stem Cell Research Laboratory, said: "HCII/T complex was originally developed in Canada as a test for patients with MPSI, II and VI. We were able to show that HCII/T complex can clearly distinguish between untreated patients with MPSI, MPSII, MPSIIIA, MPSIIIB, MPSIIIC, MPSVI and unaffected individuals.

"We also went on to monitor long-term clinical outcomes in patients with MPSI, MPSII and MPSVI after treatment to show that elevations of both this biomarker, and the dermatan sulphate:chondroitin sulphate biomarker currently used in the diagnostic laboratory in Manchester, correlated with clinical treatment outcomes in patients.

"Two of the sugars that are commonly accumulated in MPS diseases are heparan sulphate (HS) and dermatan sulphate (DS). Other sugars such as chondroitin sulphate (CS) are usually not accumulated in the disease. By measuring the ratio of DS:CS in urine we can accurately diagnose the disease, but detection of sugars is expensive and technically challenging. Instead, the HCIIT method relies on detection of proteins binding to sugars and is much cheaper to perform."

Simon Jones, a consultant paediatrician at St Mary's Hospital in Manchester and co-author on the paper, added: "These are difficult diseases to treat and monitor so advances such as this will help us to diagnose and treat patients more effectively in the future."



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Diet and Oral Health: The Sugary Connection May Become Sour
World AIDS Day 2022 - Equalize!
Test Your Knowledge on Sugar Intake and Oral Health
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Genetics and Stem Cells Genetic Testing of Diseases Pompe Disease Farber disease Usher Syndrome Prader-Willi Syndrome Von Recklinghausen’s Disease Christianson Syndrome Aicardi-Goutieres Syndrome Alagille Syndrome 

Most Popular on Medindia

Diaphragmatic Hernia Hearing Loss Calculator Sanatogen Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Color Blindness Calculator Accident and Trauma Care Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Post-Nasal Drip
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Fatal Genetic Diseases can be Diagnosed by Blood-Clotting Agent Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests