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Evolution of English Language Being Triggered by Young Women

by Kathy Jones on December 26, 2011 at 8:50 PM
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 Evolution of English Language Being Triggered by Young Women

A new study has said that young women are leading the world in the changing style of storytelling.

According to the study by UK's Leicester University, women are more likely to disclose information about emotional topics and write about them with emoticons, kisses and unconventional typography.

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The writing style pioneered by women between the ages of 19 to 25 was picked up by other woman, especially those over 40, and teenage boys. The only group not down with the new lingo was men.

Nic Carah, University of Queensland social media expert, said that new technologies would continue to change the way people communicate.

"Facebook and Twitter have certain parameters that users have to stick to so they can keep in touch," the Courier Mail quoted Carah as saying.
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"As new social media sites and communication technologies evolve over time, there will be new rules and requirements for text, or possibly sound, data to be uploaded, and people will adjust how they deliver their messages.

"Even SMS text messaging changed the way we use language permanently," he added.

Source: ANI
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