Enzyme in Milk Production Could be a Target for New Breast Cancer Therapies

by Iswarya on  September 12, 2018 at 12:54 PM Cancer News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

Protein involved in milk production that induces the growth and spread of cancer in the breast could be a target for new therapies to treat breast cancer, reports a new study. The findings of the study are published in the journal Cancer Research.
Enzyme in Milk Production Could be a Target for New Breast Cancer Therapies
Enzyme in Milk Production Could be a Target for New Breast Cancer Therapies

Charles Clevenger, M.D., Ph.D., and a team of researchers discovered that the enzyme cyclophilin A (CypA) regulates the Jak2/Stat5 genetic pathway. This pathway is responsible for the natural maturation of mammary glands as well as the development of breast cancer cells.

"This research identifies cyclophilin A as a relevant target for therapeutic intervention in breast cancer. Because FDA-approved drugs are available to inhibit the action of CypA, translation of these findings to breast cancer patients should be rapid," said Clevenger, interim associate director for basic research, member of the Cancer Cell Signaling research program and Carolyn Wingate Endowed Chair in Cancer Research at VCU Massey Cancer Center. "No study to date had previously examined the loss of CypA function during mammary development and the formation of cancer."

By deleting the CypA enzyme in mouse models with ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer, Clevenger and his team were able to inhibit the activation of the Stat5 pathway. This inhibition correlated to an increase in mammary tumor latency, which means they were able to slow or completely halt the growth of breast cancer cells.

The discovery of CypA's contribution to the development of breast cancer was helped by previous observations of prolactin receptor (PRLr) signaling. Prolactin is the hormone that is primarily responsible for the production of milk during pregnancy, and earlier research by Clevenger has also linked it to the growth of breast tumors. By more closely analyzing the genetic pathways associated with PRLr signaling (including Jak2 and Stat5), CypA was revealed to be a major participant in the activation of those pathways.

"This study demonstrated many similarities to other loss-of-function mouse models of the PRL-PRLr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling pathway. However, what distinguishes the CypA-deprived mouse models from the other genetic deletion models was the mice's ability to still successfully lactate and nurse their offspring, despite the loss of an enzyme critical to mammary gland development," said Clevenger, who is also the chair of pathology at the VCU School of Medicine.

Clevenger believes the mice's continued ability to lactate is related to the fact that there is a significant, but not complete, deactivation of the Jak2/Stat5 signaling pathways.

The research builds upon a decade of work performed in Clevenger's labs at Massey and Northwestern University. He said he and his team would continue to conduct further studies in pre-clinical models.

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

More News on:

Women and Cancer Breast Biopsy Pasteurization of milk Pagets disease of the breast Mastitis Cancer and Homeopathy Types of Milk Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Breast Cancer Facts 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive