Early-onset of Menstruation May Up Type 2 Diabetes Risk

by Adeline Dorcas on  July 31, 2019 at 4:15 PM Women Health News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

Women who start menstruating at an early age are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, reports a new study. The findings of the study are published in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
Early-onset of Menstruation May Up Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Early-onset of Menstruation May Up Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Diabetes is a global health concern expected to affect 693 million people worldwide by 2045. It's been well documented how diet and exercise influence risk of type 2 diabetes; however, a new study suggests that early menarche also is associated with a higher risk, but body mass index (BMI) may mediate this association.

Show Full Article


Type 2 diabetes mellitus has become one of the most common diseases worldwide. In 2015, it affected nearly 8.8% of people aged 20 to 79 globally, and by 2040, it is expected to affect 10.4%. With so many people affected, it is not surprising how much research has been devoted to identifying determinants of the disease in order to prevent its development. Various lifestyle and environmental factors have already been confirmed, but there is also growing evidence pointing to some physiologic factors.

A new study analyzing more than 15,000 postmenopausal women in China has found that women who begin menstruating at an earlier age have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. More specifically, each year of delay in menarche age correlated with a 6% lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

Although this is not the first study to suggest the association between menarche and diabetes, it provides added evidence regarding the increased risk, as well as the fact that BMI can partially mediate the association and the proportion of that effect is 28%.

Study results appear in the article "Early menarche is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in rural Chinese women and is partially mediated by BMI: the Henan Rural Cohort Study."

"This study of rural Chinese women indicates that the average age of menarche is delayed relative to western countries at 16.1 years and is linked with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Earlier onset of menses (14 y) was associated with diabetes in later life, likely driven by adult BMI. Other factors such as nutrition and BMI in childhood may also play a role in this association," says Dr. Stephanie Faubion, NAMS medical director.

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

Recommended Reading

More News on:

Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetes Diabetic Diet Otitis Media Diabetes - Essentials Diabetes - Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Insulin Delivery Devices Diabetes and Exercise Primary Amenorrhea Stress Relief Through Alternative Medicine 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive