Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Medindia
Advertisement

Dietary Cholesterol or Egg Consumption Do Not Increase Stroke Risk

by Hannah Joy on May 21, 2019 at 1:30 PM
Dietary Cholesterol or Egg Consumption Do Not Increase Stroke Risk

A moderately high intake of dietary cholesterol or consuming one egg per day does not increase the risk of developing stroke, reveals a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.

Furthermore, no association was found in carriers of the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism and is remarkably common among the Finnish population. The findings were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Advertisement


Findings from earlier studies addressing the association of dietary cholesterol or egg intake with the risk of stroke have been contradictory. Some studies have found an association between high dietary cholesterol intake and an increased risk of stroke, while others have associated the consumption of eggs, which are high in cholesterol, with a reduced risk of stroke.

For most people, dietary cholesterol plays a very small role in affecting their serum cholesterol levels. However, in carriers of the apolipoprotein E phenotype 4 - which significantly impacts cholesterol metabolism - the effect of dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol levels is greater.
Advertisement

In Finland, the prevalence of APOE4, which is a hereditary variant, is exceptionally high, with approximately one third of the population presenting as carriers. Yet, research data on the association between a high intake of dietary cholesterol and the risk of stroke in this population group has not been available until now.

The dietary habits of 1,950 men aged between 42 and 60 years with no baseline diagnosis of a cardiovascular disease were assessed at the onset the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, KIHD, in 1984-1989 at the University of Eastern Finland. APOE phenotype data were available for 1,015 of the men participating in the study. Of those, 32% were known carriers of APOE4.

During a follow-up of 21 years, 217 men were diagnosed with stroke. The study found that neither dietary cholesterol nor egg consumption was associated with the risk of stroke - not even in carriers of APOE4.

The findings suggest that moderate cholesterol intake or daily egg consumption are not associated with the risk of stroke, even in persons who are genetically predisposed to a greater effect of dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol levels.

In the highest control group, the study participants had an average daily dietary cholesterol intake of 520 mg and they consumed an average of one egg per day, which means that the findings cannot be generalized beyond these levels.

One egg contains approximately 200 mg of cholesterol. In this study, about a fourth of the total dietary cholesterol consumed came from eggs.

Furthermore, the generalizability of this study is also weakened by the fact that the study population did not have a pre-existing cardiovascular disease at baseline and the size of the study population was relatively small. Therefore, the findings of the study should be verified in a larger cohort as well as in people with a pre-existing cardiovascular disease, who are currently advised to limit their intake of cholesterol and eggs.



Source: Eurekalert
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Readings

Latest Diet & Nutrition News

Swap Pulses For Protein & Grains for a Nutritious American Diet
The nutritional profile of American diet can be significantly improved by substituting small amounts of pulses for refined grains and common protein sources.
Limiting Obesity-Linked Isoleucine in Diet Promotes Healthy Aging
Lowering the intake of isoleucine in diet can extend lifespan, promote a slim body, anti-aging properties, and reduce cancer and prostate health issues.
Expert Guidance on Thanksgiving Leftovers
Keep Thanksgiving leftovers safe: Refrigerate promptly, use airtight containers, label and date, and reheat properly.
How Nutrition Overcomes Anxiety, Depression & Diabetes?
Poor nutrition raises the risk of type 2 diabetes, and mental issues like anxiety and depression. Nutrition interventions aid in managing these health issues.
Micronutrient Deficiencies as a Silent Driver of Global Antibiotic Resistance
Micronutrient deficiencies may play a crucial role in the worldwide surge of antibiotic resistance.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Dietary Cholesterol or Egg Consumption Do Not Increase Stroke Risk Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests