About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Dangers Of Texting To Childrens' English Is Non-Existent

by Tanya Thomas on September 26, 2009 at 8:48 AM
Font : A-A+

 Dangers Of Texting To Childrens' English Is Non-Existent

After much debating, a study has finally confirmed that that text/IM/chat speak doesn't hurt kids' language and spelling skills.

In fact, one researcher has described the act of translating the abbreviations as a "brain workout" for those who participate.

Advertisement

In the study, a group of University of Alberta researchers has shown that language commonly used in instant messaging has no effect on your child's spelling abilities. If anything, says study author Connie Varnhagen, using language variations commonly used in instant messaging and texting is actually a good sign.

Varnhagen's findings come from a class-based study that was recently published in Reading and Writing.

A group of third-year psychology students proposed and designed a study to test whether new Simple Messaging Service, or SMS, language-also known as chatspeak-which refers to the abbreviations and slang commonly used when texting, emailing or chatting online, had an influence on students' spelling habits. The group surveyed roughly 40 students from ages 12 to 17. The participants were asked to save their instant messages for a week. At the end of the study, the participants completed a standardized spelling test.
Advertisement

While the researchers expected there to be some correlation between poor spelling and chatspeak, Varnhagen said they were pleasantly surprised by the results.

"Kids who are good spellers [academically] are good spellers in instant messaging," she said.

"And kids who are poor spellers in English class are poor spellers in instant messaging," she added.

Girls used more chatspeak than boys, who preferred to express themselves through repeated use of punctuation. However, the study found that boys who used chatspeak and abbreviations more frequently were poorer spellers.

Conversely, girls who used more abbreviations were better spellers than girls who did not use many abbreviations in their messages, the study found.

Source: ANI
TAN
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Printed Temperature Sensors help with Continuous Temperature Monitoring
Health Benefits of Giloy
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


Recommended Reading
Young Brains Damaged Due To Repeated Texting, And Not Radiation
Repeated predictive texting, not radiation, is to be blamed for affecting brains of young people ......
Research On Unnecessary Word Usage When Texting Lands Student Her Doctorate
A Birmingham University student has received a PhD in text messaging after she found that ......
Texting Increases Crash Risk 23 Times: Study
Talking on a cell phone while driving increases the risk of a crash but not nearly as much as text ....
Experts Warn That Texting Lowers Health And School Performance
Texting may have become a popular way of communication among teenagers, but it could lead to .....

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use