About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Cutting Down 300 Calories Daily Improves Bio-Markers Even Among Healthy Adults

by Mary Selvaraj on July 15, 2019 at 3:14 PM
Font : A-A+

Cutting Down 300 Calories Daily Improves Bio-Markers Even Among Healthy Adults

Healthy weight adults who cut down 300 calories daily showed improvements in bio-markers and reduced the risk of cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. There is an improvement in levels of cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, and other markers. Researchers try to find the underlying metabolic signal or magic molecule to explain the mechanism.

New data from a two-year Duke Health trial suggests when it comes to cutting your risk for killer ailments such as diabetes and heart disease, there's always room for improvement.

Advertisement


In adults already at a healthy weight or carrying just a few extra pounds, cutting around 300 calories a day significantly improved already good levels of cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar and other markers. The findings of the randomized, controlled trial of 218 adults under age 50 are described in a July 11 article in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

The trial, part of an ongoing project with the National Institutes of Health called CALERIE (Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy) continues to build on the researchers' hypothesis that it's not just weight loss that leads to these improvements, but some more complex metabolic change triggered by eating fewer calories than what's expended.
Advertisement

"There's something about caloric restriction, some mechanism we don't yet understand that results in these improvements," said the study's lead author William E. Kraus, M.D., a cardiologist and distinguished professor of medicine at Duke. "We have collected blood, muscle and other samples from these participants and will continue to explore what this metabolic signal or magic molecule might be."

For the first month of the trial, participants ate three meals a day that would cut one-fourth of their daily calories to help train them on the new diet. They could choose from six different meal plans that accommodated cultural preferences or other needs. Participants also attended group and individual counseling sessions for the first six months of the trial, while members of a control group simply continued their usual diet and met with researchers once every six months.

Participants were asked to maintain the 25 percent calorie reduction for two years. Their ability to do that varied, with the average calorie reduction for all participants being about 12 percent. Still, they were able to sustain a 10-percent drop in their weight, 71 percent of which was fat, the study found. There were numerous improvements in markers that measure risk for metabolic disease. After two years, participants also showed a reduction in a biomarker that indicates chronic inflammation which has also been linked to heart disease, cancer and cognitive decline.

"This shows that even a modification that is not as severe as what we used in this study could reduce the burden of diabetes and cardiovascular disease that we have in this country," Kraus said. "People can do this fairly easily by simply watching their little indiscretions here and there, or maybe reducing the amount of them, like not snacking after dinner."

For example, 300 calories is six Oreo cookies.



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Monkeypox Outbreak: What it is, How Does it Spread & the Prevention
Seasonal Allergy Medications
How to Choose the Best Eczema-Friendly Moisturizer for Children?
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Lifestyle Modification: No Big Deal! Healthy Gifting Ideas for Diwali How to Keep Christmas Calories under Control The Spark Solution Diet 

Most Popular on Medindia

Drug - Food Interactions A-Z Drug Brands in India Find a Doctor Daily Calorie Requirements Color Blindness Calculator Find a Hospital The Essence of Yoga Noscaphene (Noscapine) Blood - Sugar Chart Indian Medical Journals

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE