Medindia
Advertisement

Common Blood Pressure Drug may Raise the Risk of Developing Bowel Disease

by Iswarya on July 4, 2019 at 2:26 PM

Common Blood Pressure Drug may Raise the Risk of Developing Bowel Disease
Taking a popular blood pressure medicine known as calcium-channel blocker may put people, especially older adults at risk of developing a dangerous bowel condition, warns a new study. The findings of the study are published in the journal Circulation.

This condition causes small bulges or pouches to appear in the lining of the intestine. Particularly affecting the elderly (as many as 65 percent of over 85s may be affected), diverticulosis can in some cases lead to a medical emergency if the pouches become infected or burst.
Advertisement


The new early-stage research finding comes from a team of scientists led by Imperial College London, who investigated the effectiveness and side effects of three common blood pressure medications: ACE-inhibitors, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers.

High blood pressure affects one in ten adults across the globe and increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. The most common treatments for high blood pressure are lifestyle changes and medications.
Advertisement

However, despite the three main medications being taken by millions, investigating their potential side effects (as well as studying their effectiveness for treating other diseases), can be difficult and often involves lengthy and expensive clinical trials.

To overcome this problem, the research team, led by Imperial's School of Public Health, used genetic analyses to study the effects of the drugs.

By investigating versions of genes that mimic the effects of these drugs, the team was able to study the drugs' effectiveness - and their potential side effects.

First, the researchers, who published their work in the journal Circulation, identified the proteins targeted by the drugs, and which help lower blood pressure. Next, they analyzed genetic data from around 750,000 people and identified the so-called genetic variants that code for these proteins.

The team, who included researchers from LMU Munich, then studied whether these gene variants - which cause increased production of these proteins - were linked to an increased or decreased risk of other diseases.

The good news was that, as expected, these so-called genetic variants (which coded for proteins involved in lowering blood pressure) were linked to lower heart disease and stroke risk.

However, after assessing the risk of around 900 different diseases - using data from the UK Biobank study - the team found that the versions of genes related to the effects of a particular type of calcium channel blocker - the non-dihydropyridine class, were linked to an increased the risk of a bowel condition called diverticulosis.

The team compared their findings with further genetic data and supported the potential link with an increased risk of the bowel condition.

The link now needs further investigation with larger trials, explains Dr. Dipender Gill, co-lead author of the research from Imperial's School of Public Health: "This is the first time that this class of blood pressure drug has been associated with diverticulosis. We're not sure of the underlying mechanism - although it may relate to effects on the function of intestine muscles, which perform contractions to transport food through the gut."

Dr. Joanna Tzoulaki, a senior author from Imperial's School of Public Health, added: "The study of genetic variants that mimic the effect of drugs is evolving as a powerful concept to help prioritize clinical trials and design clinical trials more likely to be successful."

Dr. Gill cautions the findings should not change current prescribing guidelines and that people should not stop taking their medication unless first consulting their doctor. He added: "These findings should not change clinical practice, but instead should act as a catalyst for further research."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Linked to Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children
Type 2 Diabetes can be Controlled by Unripen Green Jackfruit Flour
Covid Pandemic: How Parents can Help Kids Deal with Back-to-School Anxiety
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
High Blood Pressure Drug Toxicity Thalassemia Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Diet and High Blood Pressure Signature Drug Toxicity Stress and the Gender Divide Quiz on Hypertension Heart Attack- Lifestyle Risks Crohns Disease 

Recommended Reading
High Fiber Diet Boosts Diverticulosis Risk
Diet rich in fiber content increases the risk of diverticulosis, reveals research....
Combination Therapy for High Blood Pressure
Anti-hypertensive agents are still the treatment drugs for hypertension but recent advances ......
Fruits to Help Lower Blood Pressure
Top reasons why you should eat fruits to lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart disease. ...
Benefits of Blood Pressure Tablets on your Health
Hypertension affects about a billion individuals worldwide and is a silent killer. Medication & ......
Crohns Disease
Crohn’s disease or regional enteritis is an inflammatory bowel disease that involves the small intes...
Diet and High Blood Pressure
High blood pressure or hypertension is defined as a blood pressure of above 140 mm Hg (systolic) and...
Drug Toxicity
Drug toxicity is an adverse reaction of the body towards a drug that results as a side effect of a d...
Heart Attack- Lifestyle risks
Heart attack is the death of the heart muscle due to loss of blood supply. Simple guidelines to avoi...
High Blood Pressure
High blood pressure or hypertension is a chronic condition, which usually lasts a lifetime once it i...
Stress and the Gender Divide
Stress has become entwined in the current lifestyle of a young working couple and has resulted in th...
Thalassemia
Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder passed on through parental genes causing the body to prod...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use