About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Cocaine Addiction Resolved by Tiny RNA Molecule

by Rathi Manohar on July 10, 2010 at 12:40 PM
Font : A-A+

Cocaine Addiction Resolved by Tiny RNA Molecule

An extraordinarily tiny fragment of RNA could hold the key to resolve cocaine addiction in humans, say researchers who base their conclusion on their study on rats.

The discovery could lead to better ways of predicting drug abuse risk and treating addictions

Advertisement

In the study, researchers at The Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Florida found that cocaine consumption increased levels of a specific microRNA sequence in the brains of rats, named microRNA-212.

As its levels increased, the rats exhibited a growing dislike for cocaine, ultimately controlling how much they consumed.

On the other hand, as levels of microRNA-212 decreased, the rats consumed more cocaine and became the rat equivalent of compulsive users.
Advertisement

The study's findings suggest that microRNA-212 plays a pivotal role in regulating cocaine intake in rats and perhaps in vulnerability to addiction.

Interestingly, the same microRNA-212 identified in this study, is also expressed in the human's dorsal striatum, a brain region that has been linked to drug abuse and habit formation.

"This study enhances our understanding of how brain mechanisms, at their most fundamental levels, may contribute to cocaine addiction vulnerability or resistance to it," Nature quoted National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Director Dr. Nora D. Volkow, as saying.

"This research provides a wonderful example of how basic science discoveries are critical to the development of new medical treatments and targeted prevention," he added.

Rats with a history of extended cocaine access can demonstrate behavior similar to that observed in humans who are dependent on the drug.

Current data show that about 15 percent of people who use cocaine become addicted to it.

The findings suggest that microRNAs may be important factors contributing to this vulnerability.

"The results of this study offer promise for the development of a totally new class of anti-addiction medications. Because we are beginning to map out how this specific microRNA works, we may be able to develop new compounds to manipulate the levels of microRNA-212 therapeutically with exquisite specificity, opening the possibility of new treatments for drug addiction," said Paul J. Kenny, senior author on the study.

The study is published in the journal Nature.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
Dietary Factors Responsible for Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) Production and Hair Loss
Test Your Knowledge About Chromosomes?
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Cannabis Drug Abuse Screening Test Drug Abuse Drug Detox Drugs to Treat Tobacco / Nicotine Addiction Pyromania (Impulse Control Disorder) 

Most Popular on Medindia

The Essence of Yoga Daily Calorie Requirements Post-Nasal Drip Drug - Food Interactions Diaphragmatic Hernia How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Blood - Sugar Chart Blood Pressure Calculator Find a Hospital
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Cocaine Addiction Resolved by Tiny RNA Molecule Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests