Medindia
Advertisement

Civil War In Sri Lanka: What Happened To The Mental State Of The Displaced People?

by Rishika Gupta on April 2, 2019 at 10:59 PM

 Civil War In Sri Lanka: What Happened To The Mental State Of The Displaced People?
Mental health does take a hit, when people are displaced as a result of war. This study shows us that 58% of people displaced following the civil war in Sri Lanka have suffered mental health problems.

Researchers conducted interviews with around 1,000 displaced adults at 25 hospitals across Northern Sri Lanka. They screened for a range of mental health disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and PTSD.
Advertisement


Around 83% reported they had not seen a mental health specialist in the previous three months, despite 58% reporting having mental health disorders.

The study also found unemployment and low education levels were factors that contributed to poor mental health, while women were also found to be more likely than men to suffer disorders.
Advertisement

The Sri Lankan Civil War (1983-2009) was an armed conflict between the Tamal Tigers and the Sri Lankan government as the Tamal Tigers attempted to create an independent state in the north and the east of the island. Approximately 80-100,000 were killed and 500,000 were displaced.

The project was the first to review mental health issues after the war and found that there are significant unmet mental health needs in the region. Dr. Shannon Doherty, Senior Lecturer at Anglia Ruskin University and lead researcher in this project, said: "In the aftermath of conflict, physical injuries can be prioritized over serious mental health issues. We found that a worrying number of people in Sri Lanka have suffered with disorders and had not had access to appropriate treatment.

"In the second phase of our project, we aim to provide new approaches to offer mental health support to the victims of the civil war. We hope that it will help to resolve the crisis in Sri Lanka, and be applicable in future to other areas of conflict."

The paper was published in the journal BMC Psychiatry.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
'Hybrid Immunity' may Help Elude COVID-19 Pandemic
Stroop Effect
Plant-Based Diet may Reduce the Risk of COVID-19
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Warts 

Recommended Reading
Latinos In US Are Not Seeking Help For Mental Health Issues Due To Religious Beliefs
Stigma/disgrace associated with Mental health among Latinos is preventing them from seeking help ......
Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children Could Signal Future Mental Health Problems
Increased gastrointestinal symptoms such as stomach pain, constipation, vomiting and nausea in ......
Income Inequalities Linked to Mental Health Issues
Indigenous peoples in Canada have high rates of psychological distress, suicidal thoughts and ......
Mental Health State Linked to Higher Death Rates for Prostate, Urological Cancers
Pre-existing mental health state has a significant influence on prostate and urological cancers ......
Warts
Warts arise on damaged skin infected with HPV and are common in children, young adults, and those wi...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use