About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Children Can Develop Fatigue-Resistant Muscles Same As That Of Athletes

by Rishika Gupta on April 25, 2018 at 10:53 PM
Font : A-A+

 Children Can Develop Fatigue-Resistant Muscles Same As That Of Athletes

Did you know that kids tend to develop fatigue-resistant muscles which are almost similar to that of endurance athletes in terms recovery time? The findings of the new study are published in the Frontiers in Physiology.

Children not only have fatigue-resistant muscles but recover very quickly from high-intensity exercise -- even faster than well-trained adult endurance athletes.

Advertisement


The research here compared the energy output and post-exercise recovery rates of young boys, untrained adults, and endurance athletes. The research could help develop the athletic potential in children as well as improve our understanding of how our bodies change from childhood to adulthood -- including how these processes contribute to the risk of diseases such as diabetes.

"During many physical tasks, children might tire earlier than adults because they have limited cardiovascular capability, tend to adopt less-efficient movement patterns and need to take more steps to move a given distance.
Advertisement

Our research shows children have overcome some of these limitations through the development of fatigue-resistant muscles and the ability to recover very quickly from high-intensity exercise," say Sébastien Ratel, Associate Professor in Exercise Physiology who completed this study at the Université Clermont Auvergne, France, and co-author Anthony Blazevich, Professor in Biomechanics at Edith Cowan University, Australia.

Previous research has shown that children do not tire as quickly as untrained adults during physical tasks. Ratel and Blazevich suggested the energy profiles of children could be comparable to endurance athletes, but there was no evidence to prove this until now.

The researchers asked three different groups -- 8-12-year-old boys and adults of two different fitness levels -- to perform cycling tasks. The boys and untrained adults were not participants in the regular vigorous physical activity. In contrast, the last group, the endurance athletes, were national-level competitors at triathlons or long-distance running and cycling.

Each group was assessed for the body's two different ways of producing energy. The first, aerobic, uses oxygen from the blood. The second, anaerobic, doesn't use oxygen and produces acidosis and lactate (often known by the incorrect term, lactic acid), which may cause muscle fatigue. The participants' heart-rate, oxygen levels, and lactate-removal rates were checked after the cycling tasks to see how quickly they recovered.

In all tests, the children outperformed the untrained adults.

"We found the children used more of their aerobic metabolism and were, therefore, less tired during the high-intensity physical activities," says Ratel. "They also recovered very quickly -- even faster than the well-trained adult endurance athletes -- as demonstrated by their faster heart-rate recovery and ability to remove blood lactate."

"This may explain why children seem to have the ability to play and play and play, long after adults have become tired."

Ratel and Blazevich explain the significance of their findings. "Many parents ask about the best way to develop their child's athletic potential. Our study shows that muscle endurance is often very good in children, so it might be better to focus on other areas of fitness such as their sports technique, sprint speed or muscle strength. This may help to optimize physical training in children so that they perform better and enjoy sports more."

Ratel continues, "With the rise in diseases related to physical inactivity, it is helpful to understand the physiological changes with growth that might contribute to the risk of disease. Our research indicates that aerobic fitness, at least at the muscle level, decreases significantly as children move into adulthood -- which is around the time increases in diseases such as diabetes occur. "It will be interesting in future research to determine whether the muscular changes we have observed are directly related to disease risk. At least, our results might provide motivation for practitioners to maintain muscle fitness as children grow up; it seems that being a child might be healthy for us."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Top 7 Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene
Healthy and Safer Thanksgiving 2021
Long-Term Glycemic Control - A Better Measure of COVID-19 Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Height and Weight-Kids Diet and Nutrition Tips for Athletes Wrist Sprain Dystonia 

Recommended Reading
New Technology Could Inform Athletes If Their Injured Tendons are Ready for Action
A new wearable device that measures tendon tension provides insights into the motor control and ......
We Want Healthy Protein, Not French Fries, Say Smart Young Athletes Now
Motivated by performance, young athletes now prefer a healthy meal experience to improve their ......
Estrogen Replacement as a Treatment for Disordered Eating in Female Athletes
Estrogen replacement therapy may help treat disordered eating behavior in female athletes with ......
Intense Strain may Put Young Athletes at Risk of Bone Marrow Edema
Young athletes who undergo a high-intensity mechanical strain may develop Bone marrow edema in the ....
Diet and Nutrition Tips for Athletes
Athletes can be physically fit by consuming a well balanced nutritious diet, which keeps them mental...
Dystonia
Dystonia is a neurological condition in which the patient experiences involuntary muscle contraction...
Wrist Sprain
A wrist sprain is an injury to a ligament in the wrist. It may be mild, moderate or severe, dependin...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use