About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Cancer Drug can Provide Protection Against Vascular Clots

by Kathy Jones on June 12, 2014 at 10:35 PM
Font : A-A+

 Cancer Drug can Provide Protection Against Vascular Clots

A drug that is currently being used to help cancer patients can protect thousands of people from vascular clots, a new study conducted by Case Western Reserve University researchers reveals.

In 2008, the Food and Drug Administration approved bortezomib (Velcade) to treat multiple myeloma, which is a type of bone cancer and mantle cell lymphoma - a particularly aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In addition to attacking cancer cells, the drug has been shown to help prevent clot development common to many forms of the disease.

Advertisement

As hematologist Lalitha Nayak, MD, an assistant professor of medicine, reports in the June 12 edition of the journal Blood, the anti-thrombotic effects of bortezomib are determined by KLF2, part of a family of Kruppel-like factors - master regulators of vascular health.

"We thought that if we could figure out how bortezomib protects against thrombosis," Nayak explained, "we might be closer to understanding why our patients develop blood clots and what could be done to help them."
Advertisement

She is also a member of the Mukesh Jain, MD, Laboratory at Case Western Reserve University, so she was also well aware of the laboratory's work in Kruppel-like factors. KLF2 specifically is a protein in the Kruppel-like gene family of transcription factors that prevents clot formation in the body's major blood vessels. (Transcription factor is a protein that controls the flow of genetic information that provides instructions to our bodies on how to function.)

"Work from our laboratory during the past decade has established Kruppel-like factors as nodal regulators of vascular health," said Jain, cardiologist and professor of medicine. "It was a good educated guess by Dr. Nayak that bortezomib's positive effect on vascular function was linked to a member of this family."

Nayak concurs. "We hypothesized that bortezomib protects against thrombosis by increasing KLF levels," she said.

She took her curious, yet pleasantly surprising, observation regarding bortezomib's thromboprotective effect to the laboratory. In her investigations, Nayak first showed that bortezomib treatment rendered normal mice resistant to clot formation. Next, she demonstrated that among the 17 members of the KLF family, bortezomib specifically and potently induced KLF2 levels. Finally, she confirmed the importance of KLF2 by injecting bortezomib into mice missing the KLF2 gene. Although bortezomib treatment protected normal mice from thrombosis, this effect was absent in the KLF2-deficient mice. "This taught us how important KLF2 is for the ability of bortezomib to protect against thrombosis," Nayak said.

The results of this study have the potential to alter the management of thrombosis in patients who have a predisposition to clot formation and especially in situations where present modalities of therapy are inadequate. One example of such a condition is antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APLS), a condition where patients have an increased risk for blood clots in both arteries and veins. The disease often affects young women, and there is no effective antithrombotic strategy for this group of patients. Moreover, currently used antithrombotic therapies are associated with an increased risk for bleeding. Although bortezomib protects against thrombosis, it comes with no concurrent increase in bleeding, making this drug a potential treatment alternative for APLS patients.

"Vascular clots are the No. 1 cause of death and disability worldwide," Nayak said. "Our studies show that increasing KLF2 levels provides a favorable thromboprotective effect."

At present, KLF2 levels can be pharmacologically altered with bortezomib. Importantly, the study showed that bortezomib can induce KLF2 levels and provide protection against thrombosis, even when used at much lower doses than those used to treat patients with myeloma.

"We are not trying to kill a cancer, so we started with smaller doses of the medication," Nayak said. "In our study, we were able to use one-third of the usual anti-tumor dose used in animal studies and found that this lower dose still resulted in a good antithrombotic effect."

Additionally, KLF2 itself could also serve as a biomarker, Jain said. "Examining KLF2 levels in blood cells might inform clinicians about a patient's risk for thrombotic events," Jain said. "This would help us identify patients who may benefit from upfront preventive therapy for thrombosis."

Jain and Nayak gave credit for collaboration in the investigation to Alvin H. Schmaier, MD, professor of medicine, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, and hematologist/oncologist, University Hospitals Case Medical Center. Additionally, the work was supported by a Mentored Research Award granted by the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society (2011-2013), Visconsi Scholarship to the Case Western Reserve Cardiovascular Research Institute, the American Heart Association Established Investigator Award, and National Institutes of Health grants (HL087595, HL117759, HL052279-18, HL112666-02, R01 HL075427, HL097593, HL112486, HL119195 and HL086548).

About Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Founded in 1843, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is the largest medical research institution in Ohio and is among the nation's top medical schools for research funding from the National Institutes of Health. The School of Medicine is recognized throughout the international medical community for outstanding achievements in teaching. The School's innovative and pioneering Western Reserve2 curriculum interweaves four themes--research and scholarship, clinical mastery, leadership, and civic professionalism--to prepare students for the practice of evidence-based medicine in the rapidly changing health care environment of the 21st century. Nine Nobel Laureates have been affiliated with the School of Medicine.

Annually, the School of Medicine trains more than 800 MD and MD/PhD students and ranks in the top 25 among U.S. research-oriented medical schools as designated by U.S. News & World Report's "Guide to Graduate Education."

The School of Medicine's primary affiliate is University Hospitals Case Medical Center and is additionally affiliated with MetroHealth Medical Center, the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Cleveland Clinic, with which it established the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University in 2002. casemed.case.edu




Source: Newswise
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Diet and Oral Health: The Sugary Connection May Become Sour
World AIDS Day 2022 - Equalize!
Test Your Knowledge on Sugar Intake and Oral Health
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Drug Toxicity Cancer and Homeopathy Signature Drug Toxicity Cancer Facts Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Oncology Drug Delivery Systems Common Lifestyle Habits that Cause Diseases Health Benefits of Dandelion Plant Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors for Cancer Treatment 

Most Popular on Medindia

Color Blindness Calculator Drug Side Effects Calculator Noscaphene (Noscapine) Hearing Loss Calculator Iron Intake Calculator Daily Calorie Requirements Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Vent Forte (Theophylline) Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Find a Hospital
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Cancer Drug can Provide Protection Against Vascular Clots Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests