Can Postnatal Depression affect Mother-child Relationship?

by Hannah Joy on  February 21, 2018 at 12:49 PM Mental Health News
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Postnatal Depression (PND) continues to have lifelong detrimental effects on mother-child relationships, which can also affect multi-generational relationships.
Can Postnatal Depression affect Mother-child Relationship?
Can Postnatal Depression affect Mother-child Relationship?

PND is well-known to have an adverse effect on mothers' relationships with their children. This has a subsequent impact on child development from early infancy to adolescence and influences emotional, cognitive, and physical development in children.

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Now, the research was led by Dr Sarah Myers and overseen by Dr Sarah Johns in the School of Anthropology and Conservation.

They surveyed 305 women mainly from the UK and US with an average age of 60 and who had given birth to an average of 2.2 children. Their children ranged in age from 8 to 48, with an average age of 29 and many of whom now had their own children. This wide-ranging data set allowed them to assess the impact of PND over a longer time frame than has been hitherto examined.

Their data showed that women who had PND reported lower relationship quality with their offspring, including those children who are now adults and that the worse the PND had been the worse the later relationship quality was.

While mothers who experienced depressive symptoms at other times had worse relationships with all of their children, PND was found to be specifically detrimental to the relationship mothers had with their child whose birth triggered the PND.

This suggests that factors which affect mother-child relationships in early infancy can have lifelong consequences on the relationship that is formed over time.

Another discovery from the research was that women who suffer from PND with a child, and then in later life become a grandmother via that child, form a less emotionally close relationship with that grandchild. This continues the negative cycle associated with PND as the importance of grandmothers in helping with the rearing of grandchildren is well-documented.

The researchers hope the findings will encourage the ongoing development and implantation of preventative measures to combat PND. Investment in prevention will not only improve mother-child relationships, but also future grandmother-grandchild relationships.

The paper, titled Postnatal depression is associated with detrimental life-long and multi-generational impacts on relationship quality, has been published in the open-access journal PeerJ.



Source: Eurekalert

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