Breaks and Repairs in Our Genome Could Help Fight Cancer

by Colleen Fleiss on  June 15, 2018 at 2:10 AM Cancer News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

UCHL3 enzyme that controls DNA repair by removing ubiquitin marks from TDP1 - a DNA repair protein has been discovered by research team led by Dr Sherif El-Khamisy at the University of Sheffield's Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology.
Breaks and Repairs in Our Genome Could Help Fight Cancer
Breaks and Repairs in Our Genome Could Help Fight Cancer

Our genome, where precious genetic information is stored, is challenged with thousands of breaks every day. Cells possess an army of proteins that search for, detect and fix these breaks to maintain genome integrity, but little is known about how the cell fine-tunes the level of response in these repair factories to suit each and every repair event.

Show Full Article

. The level of proteins in our cells is controlled by synthesis and degradation. Cells get rid of proteins when not needed by attaching a small peptide called ubiquitin. An overexpression of UCHL3 causes less ubiquitination of TDP1 and increases its protein level, which is found in chemotherapy resistant cancers such as rhabdosarcoma - the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children, which has a debilitating effect on the muscles, tendons and cartilage.

. Too little UCHL3, however, was found to cause more ubiquitination of TDP1 reducing its level in neurological diseases such as ataxias - a group of disorders that affect co-ordination, balance and speech. Dr El-Khamisy said: "This study identifies UCHL3 as a novel therapeutically druggable target where suppression of its activity can improve cancer treatment, whereas encouraging and fuelling its activity can combat neurodegeneration.

. "Defective DNA repair is a common theme in a number of neurological disorders including motor neuron disease and dementia. Finding novel approaches to fuel the cell's ability to repair genomic breaks may hold promise in improving treatment of a broad range of neurological diseases."

. The five-year study is funded by a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award to Dr El-Khamisy and involved collaborations across departments at The University of Sheffield and internationally. The full study is published in the journal Cell Reports.

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions
Advertisement

More News on:

Cancer and Homeopathy Cancer Facts Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Benefits of a Vegan Diet for Fighting Cancer Common Lifestyle Habits that Cause Diseases Health Benefits of Dandelion Plant 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive