About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Brains of Rats and Bats Behave Differently on the Move

by Dr. Enozia Vakil on April 19, 2013 at 10:43 AM
Font : A-A+

 Brains of Rats and Bats Behave Differently on the Move

A new challenge to the basic model of brain study was challenged by a new study, which demonstrates how brain rhythms in bats and rats can determine how they navigate in their environments. To get a clearer picture of the processes at work in the mammal brain during spatial navigation, neuroscientists must closely study a broad range of animals, say the two University of Maryland College Park scientists involved in the study.

In the April 19, 2013 issue of Science, the University of Maryland researchers and two colleagues at Boston University reported significant differences between rats' and bats' brain rhythms in a part of the brain used in navigation.

Advertisement

The researchers focused on specialized cells that process spatial information in a region called the medial entorhinal cortex, a hub of neural networks for memory and navigation. Earlier experiments showed rats' brain cells in this area fire continuously in a rhythmic electrical signal called a theta wave when the animals are navigating through space. Some models of the brain treat theta waves as a key element of spatial navigation in all mammals, but this idea is based on rodent research, Moss said.

The Boston University-University of Maryland team tested for rhythmic electrical responses at the cellular level in bat and rat brain tissue. They found evidence for theta waves in the rat cells. But in the bat cells these waves were absent, said Moss, who has studied bats since the 1980s.
Advertisement

"This raises questions as to whether theta rhythms are actually doing what the spatial navigation theory proposes," said a co-author, UMD biology researcher Katrina MacLeod. "To understand brains, including ours, we really must study neural activity in a variety of animals."

Humans and other mammals share many common features of brain organization, and the differences in theta waves between bats and rats raises questions about how spatial information is represented in all brains.



Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Printed Temperature Sensors help with Continuous Temperature Monitoring
Health Benefits of Giloy
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) 

Recommended Reading
Elevated Glutamate Levels in Brain may Lead to Psychosis
A new study suggests that an excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate may lead to the development .....
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ)
Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a psychological measure of human intelligence. Regular physical and me...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use