Blood Vessel's Growth Helps Recover Movement: Study

by Ramya Rachamanti on  February 7, 2020 at 9:39 PM General Health News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

Loss of smallest blood vessels in muscle could ease difficulties moving and exercising. Knowing this link aids in recovery by growing more blood vessels in muscles, according to a study published in the Journal of Physiology.
Blood Vessel's Growth Helps Recover Movement: Study
Blood Vessel's Growth Helps Recover Movement: Study

When we are physically active, our heart and lungs increase the amount of oxygen in our blood that is delivered to our working muscles. Our capillaries, the smallest blood vessels, are the gateway between fuel supplied by the circulating blood and the demand generated within muscle cells.

Show Full Article


Therefore, in order for your muscles function properly, the capillaries need to be in good shape. Unfortunately, the consequence of many heath conditions is that the muscle loses capillaries and therefore movement becomes difficult.

Heavy smokers can suffer from 'smoker's leg', which is where arteries narrow and become blocked. An existing treatment for this is to widen blood vessels to improve circulation. However, this new research shows that more blood flow might not be the solution, and instead increasing the number of small blood vessels, i.e. capillaries, might be more helpful for recovering movement.

The researchers used a rat model of heart disease to study the effect of restricting the number of working capillaries in muscle on movement. Using an animal model was key because in humans you wouldn't be able to look at a change in just one consequence of the disease, as there are usually a number of problems evident at the same time.

Stuart Egginton from the University of Leeds, senior author on the study, said:

"By studying muscle we have isolated one of the complications found in many serious diseases, and found that increasing the number of small blood vessels is a new treatment option alongside the more traditional approach of widening large vessels. This research could help treat people suffering from difficulty moving, which is one of the most debilitating effects of heart disease or diabetes."

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions
Premium Membership Benefits

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive