Medindia
Advertisement

Aspirin Wards Off Drug-resistant Tuberculosis

by Ramya Rachamanti on March 26, 2019 at 4:28 PM

Aspirin Wards Off Drug-resistant Tuberculosis
Aspirin could be the new target for treating drug-resistant tuberculosis, as tuberculosis bacterium was found to hijack platelets from the blood clotting system to weaken body's immune system, according to the research led by the Centenary Institute in Sydney.

Tuberculosis is far from eradicated around the world and still infects more than 1,400 people per year in Australia. Antibiotic resistant tuberculosis is particularly deadly and expensive to treat, costing up to $250,000 to treat a single case in Australia. Scientists at the Centenary Institute have been working on new ways to treat tuberculosis by increasing the effectiveness of the immune system.
Advertisement


Using the zebrafish model of tuberculosis, the researchers used fluorescent microscopy to observe the build-up of clots and activation of platelets around sites of infection. Senior author and head of the Centenary's Immune-Vascular Interactions laboratory, Dr Stefan Oehlers, says "the zebrafish gives us literal insight into disease processes by watching cells interacting in real time".

Following their hunch that these platelets were being tricked by the infection into getting in the way of the body's immune system, the researchers treated infections with anti-platelet drugs, including widely available aspirin, and were able to prevent hijacking and allow the body to control infection better.
Advertisement

Dr Elinor Hortle, lead author of the paper published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, and Research Officer in Centenary's Immune-Vascular Interactions laboratory says "This is the first time that platelets have been found to worsen tuberculosis in an animal model. It opens up the possibility that anti-platelet drugs could be used to help the immune system fight off drug resistant TB".

There are over 1.2 million Australians living with latent tuberculosis, a non-infectious form of TB that puts them at risk of developing the active disease. "Our study provides more crucial evidence that widely available aspirin could be used to treat patients with severe tuberculosis infection and save lives," says Dr Hortle.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Stroop Effect
Plant-Based Diet may Reduce the Risk of COVID-19
Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Linked to Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Tuberculosis Tracheostomy Chemotherapy Chemotherapy Drugs Anticoagulants Healthy Living Pleural Effusion Reye’s Syndrome Silicosis Colon Polyps 

Recommended Reading
Aspirin to Lower Risk of Stroke in Women With History of Preeclampsia
Aspirin , the commonly used painkiller could reduce the risk of stroke in pregnant women having ......
Anticoagulants
Anticoagulants prevent the clotting of blood in our body. They are administered orally or via ......
Chemotherapy
‘Chemo’ means medicine or ‘drug’; ‘therapy’ means ‘treatment’. Chemotherapy refers to the use of cy...
Chemotherapy Drugs
Chemotherapy drugs perform like ‘magic bullets’ to destroy cancer cells in the body....
Colon Polyps
A colon polyp is a fleshy growth on the inside of the colon, also called the large intestine. In gen...
Pleural Effusion
Pleural effusion is the accumulation of fluid in the space between the two coverings (pleura) of the...
Reye’s Syndrome
Reye's syndrome is a medical emergency chiefly affecting children and teenagers and is marked by the...
Silicosis
Silicosis is a lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline free silica dust. It is characterise...
Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily affects the lung. It may spread to oth...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use