About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Alzheimer's Risk Better Predicted With Cognitive Tests and PET Scans

by Tanya Thomas on July 16, 2009 at 10:13 AM
Font : A-A+

 Alzheimer's Risk Better Predicted With Cognitive Tests and PET Scans

A new study believes that cognitive tests and brain scans can help detect the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

The researchers found that participants with mild cognitive impairment, who scored low on a memory recall test, and also had low glucose metabolism in particular brain regions, as detected through positron emission tomography (PET), had a 15-fold greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease within two years.

Advertisement

"Not all people with mild cognitive impairment go on to develop Alzheimer's, so it would be extremely useful to be able to identify those who are at greater risk of converting using a clinical test or biological measurement," said the study's lead author, Susan Landau, a post-doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley's Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

"Researchers are trying to determine whether treating patients before severe symptoms appear will be more effective, and that requires better diagnostic tools than what is currently available," added William Jagust, a faculty member of UC Berkeley's Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute and principal investigator of the study.
Advertisement

During the study, the researchers compared a variety of measurements that had previously shown promise as early detectors of Alzheimer's.

The measurements included scores on the Auditory Verbal Learning Test; the volume of the hippocampus, the part of the brain associated with the formation of new memory; the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 gene, which has been linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's; certain proteins found in the cerebrospinal fluid; and glucose metabolism detected in PET brain scans.

A low rate of glucose metabolism in a particular brain region is considered a sign of poor neural function.

Although hippocampus volume and the cerebrospinal fluid markers showed promise in predicting disease progression, PET scans and memory recall ability were found to be the most consistent predictors.

The findings were presented at Alzheimer's Association 2009 International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Vienna, Austria.

Source: ANI
TAN
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Good Nutrition Linked to Better Mental Health in School Children
Convulsions / Seizures / Fits - Symptom Evaluation
World Heart Day 2021 -
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Alzheimers Disease Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Diet and Alzheimer´s Disease Genetics of Alzheimer´s disease 

Recommended Reading
PET Scan may Help to Detect Alzheimer's Non-invasively
A method of medical imaging known as PET scans may allow doctors to develop a non-invasive test for ...
HRT Does Benefit Postmenopausal Women, PET Scan Shows
A new study by researchers at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, has found that the .....
PET Scan Has a Major Impact on Management of Cancer Patient Care
A study on data from America's National Oncologic PET Registry (NOPR), has confirmed that FDG-PET .....
PET Scan can Help Distinguish Alzheimer's from Other Dementia
PET scan that measures uptake of sugar in the brain significantly improves the accuracy of ......
Alzheimers Disease
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting memory and thinking and mak...
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare form of degenerative brain disorder, or brain damage that ...
Diet and Alzheimer´s Disease
Alzheimer''s begins with forgetfulness, but over time affects speech and coordination along with dra...
Genetics of Alzheimer´s disease
There are numerous genes that have been discovered that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease and ...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use