About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Alzheimer's Disease Can Now Be Reversed

by Julia Samuel on February 16, 2018 at 12:37 PM
Font : A-A+

Alzheimer's Disease Can Now Be Reversed

Reversing the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain can reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and improve cognitive function.

Gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 can completely reverse the formation of amyloid plaques -- protein fragments that the body produces normally.

Advertisement


Drugs targeting this enzyme will be able to successfully treat Alzheimer's in humans, the researchers said.

"Our study provides genetic evidence that preformed amyloid deposition can be completely reversed after sequential and increased deletion of BACE1 in the adult," said Riqiang Yan from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute in Ohio.
Advertisement

Abnormal buildup of beta-amyloid peptide, which can form large amyloid plaques in the brain and disrupt the function of neuronal synapses, is one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's.

For the study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, the team generated mice that gradually lose this enzyme as they grow older.

These mice developed normally and appeared to remain perfectly healthy over time. Then researchers bred these rodents with mice that start to develop amyloid plaques and Alzheimer's when they are 75 days old.

The resulting offspring also formed plaques at this age, even though their BACE1 levels were approximately 50 percent lower than normal.

Remarkably, the plaques began to disappear as the mice continued to age and lose BACE1 activity, until, at 10 months old, the mice had no plaques in their brains at all.

Decreasing BACE1 activity also resulted in lower beta-amyloid peptide levels and reversed other hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, such as the activation of microglial cells and the formation of abnormal neuronal processes, Yan said.

Loss of BACE1 also improved the learning and memory of mice with Alzheimer's. However, electrophysiological recordings of neurons from these animals showed that depletion of BACE1 only partially restored synaptic function, suggesting that BACE1 may be required for optimal synaptic activity and cognition, Yan said.

Source: IANS
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Printed Temperature Sensors help with Continuous Temperature Monitoring
Health Benefits of Giloy
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


Recommended Reading
Risk Factors for Alzheimers Disease
Cognitively normal adults exhibiting atrophy of their temporal lobe or damage to blood vessels in .....
Rare Disease Could Help Find Cure for Nervous-Neurologic Disorders
Single strand breaks are one of the most common types of DNA damage and could help spot other rare ....
Diseases Related to Old Age
Ageing is referred to the accumulation of changes that brings a person closer to death....
Modified Atkins Diet: All You Need to Know
Modified Atkins diet designed for weight loss and to treat seizures is high in fat and low in ......

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use