About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

ADHD Takes a Toll Well into Adulthood: Study

by Sheela Philomena on March 4, 2013 at 11:40 AM
Font : A-A+

 ADHD Takes a Toll Well into Adulthood: Study

Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to have other psychiatric disorders as adults, states recent study. Although numbers were small, they also appear more likely to commit suicide and are often incarcerated as adults.

"Only 37.5 percent of the children we contacted as adults were free of these really worrisome outcomes," says William Barbaresi, MD, of Boston Children's Hospital, lead investigator on the study, published in the April 2013 issue of Pediatrics and online March 4. "That's a sobering statistic that speaks to the need to greatly improve the long-term treatment of children with ADHD and provide a mechanism for treating them as adults."

Advertisement

"This was a unique population based study of a large group of individuals with ADHD followed from childhood to adulthood," added Slavica Katusic, MD, lead Mayo Clinic investigator of the study.

ADHD is the most common neuro-developmental disorder of childhood, affecting about 7 percent of all children and three times as many boys as girls. Most prior follow-up studies of ADHD have been small and focused on the severe end of the spectrum—like boys referred to pediatric psychiatric treatment facilities—rather than a cross-section of the ADHD population.
Advertisement

The long-running study, begun when Barbaresi was at the Mayo Clinic and continued in collaboration with Mayo researchers, led by Katusic, followed all children in Rochester, Minn. who were born from 1976 through 1982, were still in Rochester at age 5 and whose families allowed access to their medical records. That amounted to 5,718 children, including 367 who were diagnosed with ADHD; of this group; 232 participated in the follow-up study. About three-quarters had received ADHD treatment as children.

At follow-up, the researchers found:
  • 29 percent of the children with ADHD still had ADHD as adults (ascertained through structured neuropsychiatric interviews).
  • 57 percent of children with ADHD had at least one other psychiatric disorder as adults, as compared with 35 percent of controls. The most common were substance abuse/dependence, antisocial personality disorder, hypomanic episodes, generalized anxiety and major depression.
  • Of the children who still had ADHD as adults, 81 percent had at least one other psychiatric disorder, as compared with 47 percent of those who no longer had ADHD and 35 percent of controls.
  • 7 of the 367 children with ADHD (1.9 percent) had died at the time of study recruitment, 3 of them from suicide. Of the 4,946 children without ADHD whose outcomes could be ascertained, only 37 children had died, 5 by suicide.
  • 10 children with ADHD (2.7 percent) were incarcerated at the time of recruitment for the study.


"We suffer from the misconception that ADHD is just an annoying childhood disorder that's overtreated," says Barbaresi. "This couldn't be further from the truth. We need to have a chronic disease approach to ADHD as we do for diabetes. The system of care has to be designed for the long haul."

Barbaresi thinks the study findings may actually underestimate the bad outcomes of childhood ADHD. The study population in Rochester, Minn., was relatively heterogeneous and largely middle class, and the children tended to have good education and good access to health care. "One can argue that this is potentially a best-case scenario," Barbaresi says. "Outcomes could be worse in socioeconomically challenged populations."

He advises parents of children with ADHD to ensure that their children are in high-quality treatment—and remain in treatment as they enter adolescence. Children should also be assessed for learning disabilities and monitored for conditions associated with ADHD, including substance use, depression and anxiety.

"Data indicate that the stimulant medications used to treat ADHD in children are also effective in adults, although adults tend not to be treated and may not be aware they have ADHD," Barbaresi says.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Health Benefits of Sea Buckthorn
Contraceptive Pills in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Curtail Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Mushroom May Help Cut Down the Odds of Developing Depression
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Dyslexia Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Bullying at School - Tips For Schools ADHD Dyscalculia / Learning Disabilities Diet to control Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Mind-wandering Adult Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Temper Tantrum in Children Dysgraphia / Disorder of Written Expression / Writing Disorder 

Recommended Reading
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurobiological disorder that affects normal .....
Quiz on ADHD
Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD, generally abbreviated as ADHD) is considered a ......
Brilliant Human Brain - Animation
The most amazing and complex organ in the entire universe, the human brain continues to remain an .....
Study Establishes Possible Link Between Childhood Obesity and ADHD, Learning Disabilities
A possible link between high-fat diets and such childhood brain-based conditions as attention ......
Adult Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Adult attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) is a mental health condition in adults seen as h...
Diet to control Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurological disorder that affects children of ...
Dyscalculia / Learning Disabilities
Dyscalculia is a learning disability involving mathematics. Recognized by The WHO, it affects nearl...
Dysgraphia / Disorder of Written Expression / Writing Disorder
Dysgraphia or disorder of written expression is a childhood learning disorder marked by poor writing...
Dyslexia
Dyslexia is a reading disability that occurs when the brain does not properly recognize and process ...
Mind-wandering
Mind wandering is a spontaneous and unintentional shifting of attention of thoughts from a primary t...
Temper Tantrum in Children
Temper tantrum is an attention seeking behavior in young children who cannot control or express thei...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use