Achilles’ Heel in Deadly Blood Cancer Discovered

by Colleen Fleiss on  May 2, 2019 at 6:59 AM Cancer News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

A new protein known as YTHDF2 was found to play an important role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML is an aggressive cancer of white blood cells with very poor survival rates.
Achilles’ Heel in Deadly Blood Cancer Discovered
Achilles’ Heel in Deadly Blood Cancer Discovered

The study showed that the protein, known as YTHDF2, is needed to trigger and sustain the disease, but is not needed for healthy cells to function. This identifies YTHDF2 as a promising drug target for leukaemia.

A team of researchers jointly led by the University of Edinburgh and Queen Mary University of London carried out a series of experiments to understand the role of YTHDF2 in blood cancer.

Tests in blood samples donated by leukaemia patients showed that the protein is abundant in cancer cells, while experiments in mice found that the protein is required to initiate and maintain the disease.

Further tests enabled scientists to determine the biological pathway by which interfering with the function of YTHDF2 selectively kills blood cancer cells.

Importantly, they also showed that the protein is not needed to support the function of healthy blood stem cells, which are responsible for the production of all normal blood cells. In fact, blood stem cells were even more active in the absence of YTHDF2.

The study, carried out in collaboration with the University of Manchester, Harvard Medical School and the Université de Tours, was published in Cell Stem Cell. It was supported by Cancer Research UK and Wellcome.

Professor Kamil Kranc, of Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, who jointly led the study, said: "Our work sets the stage for therapeutic targeting of cancer stem cells in leukaemia while enhancing the regenerative capacity of normal blood stem cells. We hope this will establish a new paradigm in cancer treatment."

Professor Dónal O'Carroll, of the University of Edinburgh's School of Biological Sciences, who co-led the research, said: "The study shows the promise of a novel class of drugs as the basis for cancer and regenerative medicine treatments."

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

More News on:

Thalassemia Cancer and Homeopathy Cancer Facts Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Hairy Cell Leukemia Blood in Stools - Symptom Evaluation Bombay Blood Group Heel Pain Symptom Evaluation Common Lifestyle Habits that Cause Diseases 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive