Major Challenges in Prevention and Control of NCDs in SEAR Countries- II

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Limited Human Resources for Non-Communicable Disease (NCDs)

To address NCDs, human resources are in an inadequate position in South East Asia Region (SEAR).

Since health care professionals are concentrated in urban areas, there is no sufficient work force at primary care level.

Health workers have limited training in addressing NCDs, but they have traditional training for handling communicable diseases and maternal and child health issues.

In order to prevent, early diagnosis, treatment and care for NCDs- an effective training tool is needed.

Insufficient Allocation of Funds

Fund allocation for NCD programmes and disease burden are inversely proportionate.

In most of the SEAR countries, only low budget is allocated for health care.

Available funds are mostly allocated for addressing communicable diseases as well as maternal and child health issues.

“Sin tax” on tobacco and alcohol are innovative financing schemes, which generate huge funds.

There is a need to increase both domestic and international resources to address NCDs.

Difficulties in Engaging the Industry and Private Sector

Food and beverage industry and other profit making industries are the major contributors to NCDs.

Food and beverage industry people should be given a set of rules in order to reformulate products with lower sodium, lower sugar and eliminate trans fats. But it is not easy, since mostly they are in profit-making motives.

To ensure compliance of the industry with health policy norms, government regulations should be enforced.

Lack of Social Mobilization

There is an inadequate community mobilization and weak coordination that exists among civil society agencies and government agencies.

Social mobilization is needed for increasing the demand NCD control investments in the region.

Source: WHO-2011 report

SEAR Countries

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