Dr. Srini Pillay, Acclaimed Author & Neuroscientist, Explains the Brain Biology of Why Some People Could Care Less

Friday, August 3, 2018 General News
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"Self-regulation depletion (SRD) is a condition that occurs when people spend so much time focusing on getting things done that their brains simply do not have the energy to care," explains Pillay.

LOS ANGELES, Aug. 2, 2018 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- Dr. Srini Pillay, best-selling author

of TINKER DABBLE DOODLE TRY, explains the psychology and brain biology of why some people could care less, demonstrating a "whatever" attitude toward life, people, and situations around them.

"Focus eats up brain glucose. While there are many reasons for this, one often overlooked reason relates to being overworked. Called self-regulation depletion (SRD), this condition occurs when people spend so much time focusing on getting things done, that their brains simply do not have the energy to care," Pillay reveals. "To properly control your attention, you need to build unfocus time into your day. This helps to recycle your attention and gives you the balance you need to care about what is happening around you."

According to TINKER DABBLE DOODLE TRY, Unfocus Time May Include:

1. TINKERING with ideas releases your mind to wander from a state of stuckness into a possibility frame of mind, triggering neural connections and new insights.

2. DABBLING in a new endeavor—whether a hobby or fantasy—disrupts your habitual and reactive thinking, helping you find new solutions to old problems.

3. DOODLING can help you tap into another brain frequency to remove obstacles and create opportunities and inspiration.

Focus can make your world smaller, thinking of yourself as an island, and as a result, you think you don't need anybody or anything. But learning to unfocus will help you see yourself in context in the world. Although certain people claim to have no needs from others, research shows that this is probably a defense. Everybody has a need to belong. Generally, most people feel better about themselves when they are accepted by others.

The next time someone says "whatever" to you, Pillay urges us to consider the following: their brains may be depleted, they don't see the situation for what it is, or they are wrapped up in their own cocoons, unable to feel connected to the world.

"If this someone happens to be you, remember to build unfocus times into your day. Not only will it help you focus better, but it will connect you to the world and help you feel included in a way that will enhance your meaning and purpose in life," Pillay concludes.

 

SOURCE Dr. Srini Pillay



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