Congestive Heart Failure (Congestive Cardiac Failure) Current Management

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Infographics on Congestive Heart Failure

Infographics on Congestive Heart Failure
Wireless sensors in hospitals track the vital signs of at-risk patients.

When the full system is operational sensors will take blood oxygenation and heart-rate readings from at-risk patients once or twice a minute. The data will be transmitted to a base station, where they will be combined with other data in the patient's electronic medical record, such as lab test results.

The incoming vital signs and data in the medical record will be continually scrutinized by a machine-learning algorithm looking for signs of clinical deterioration. If any such signs are found, the system will call a nurse on a cell phone, alerting the nurse to check on the patient.

The idea is to create a virtual intensive care unit (ICU) where the patients aren't wired to beeping machines and instead are free to move about as they please, say Chenyang Lu, PhD, a computer scientist at Washington University in St. Louis who was the principal investigator for the prototype-network trial.

The performance of the prototype network, which was installed at Barnes-Jewish Hospital from June 4, 2009, until Jan. 31, 2010, was described at the SenSys '10 conference in Zurich, Switzerland. The feasibility study of the clinical warning system now under way at the hospital will be presented at the American Medical Informatics Association Annual Symposium this October.

The clinical warning system is part of a burgeoning new field variously called body sensor networks or wireless health that will change the future of medicine, Lu says.

Testbed in computer science departmentThe computer scientists thoroughly debugged the software and hardware for the warning system before the prototype was installed in the hospital.


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Congestive heart failure can affect many organs. For example: The weakened heart muscle may not be able to deliver enough blood to the kidneys, which in turn begin to lose their normal ability to excrete salt and water. This can cause decreased kidney function in the body to retain more fluid. The lungs can become clogged with fluid and the ability of the person to take down. The fluid can also accumulate in the liver, which hinders their ability to rid the body of toxins and produce essential proteins. The intestines can become less efficient in absorbing nutrients and drugs. The fluid can also accumulate in the extremities, causing swelling of the ankles and feet.
syras Tuesday, December 7, 2010

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