Colle’s Fracture / Broken Wrist

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Colle's fracture is a wrist fracture which occurs within an inch of the wrist joint involving the forearm bone's distal end of the radius.

Forearm Bones – Radius & Ulna Colle’s

The fracture runs transversely just above the wrist joint and displays this distal end of the bone more dorsally giving the wrist the classical "dinner fork" deformity look.

Colle's fracture is named after Abraham Colles, an Irish surgeon, who first described the condition. Another name for this fracture is the "Pouteau" fracture. It mostly results from a "slip and fall" on an outstretched hand.

Usually the incidence goes up after the rains or after the first snow fall in winter when the roads are icy and slippery or. Typically, when people fall they try and prevent injury to their head or other parts of the body by putting their hands out to hit the ground first. A bad fall results in fracture of the wrist with bruise of the skin over it. As the bone is a living hard tissue it is supplied by blood vessels and nerves. This causes the fracture to be very painful.

Fracture with Dinner Fork deformity of the wrist

Although this fracture occurs in all age groups it tends to be more common in two age groups - the elderly people and in children. In Children the bones are soft and supple and hence tend to bend easily. Here the fracture is usually incomplete while in adults it is a complete fracture. These fractures are also seen in menopausal women with osteoporosis, in whom it is second only to vertebral fractures.

Wrist arthritis can occur as a Colles fracture complication, either from cartilage injury, or from wear and tear in the joints after the fracture is healed. Carpel tunnel syndrome, characterized by numbness and tingling, may also set in after the fracture.

Latest Publications and Research on Colle’s Fracture

Diabetes and osteoporosis: Action of gastrointestinal hormones on the bone. - Published by PubMed
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gauravsax

I have the titanium rod placed on my right hand shaft bone.It has been placed for more than 4 years.I am very eager to know weather this thing should be removed immidiately or it should not be removed[no side effects].I have done all the xrays and all were good.Its seems that broken bone is already got fixed and supporting rods are useless.My age is 23 currently. People are advising that there is no need to remove it, perhaps it would invite operation cost etc. I don’t have any complications at work.But still i fell, there is lack of confidence from my side during gym and other excercises. What would you suggest to me. If removing the rod is an only option left and its too urgent then i am ready to undergo for a surgery. Please also let me know,if some wrong could happen if i don’t get it removed, as i am not too old. Please suggest me Thanks for your time

sifat.ot

Need to explain therapeutic treatment.

the data is insufficient.the surgical procedures and details of deformity are lacking

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