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Environment while serving of alcohol no factor in reduction in Alcohol-Related Injuries

by Medindia Content Team on  April 21, 2006 at 8:45 PM Alcohol & Drug Abuse News   - G J E 4
Environment while serving of alcohol no factor in reduction in Alcohol-Related Injuries
As per a review of related studies there is no effect of the serving environment on alcohol related injuries.
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Katherine Ker, lead review author said, "There is no reliable evidence that interventions in the alcohol server setting are effective in reducing injury," fatal or otherwise. There were some interventions that sounded promising, but if you're only able to train 50 percent or 60 percent of the people, you can't tell if the intervention doesn't work or if it's because of lack of compliance. If you could address the issue of compliance, you might be able to get more favorable results." Linda DeGutis, Dr.PH, a public- health expert not affiliated with the review said, "Alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes are one of the major things that we see as the result of alcohol intoxication and so we are concerned about it."

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Adding Ker said, "Every alcohol consumer has contact with the alcohol industry in that they have to go to a pub or go to the shops to buy it, so implementing such interventions in server settings is a good way of reaching a large number of people who need it."

20 studies of alcohol interventions that took place in bars, pubs, and alcohol retailers in five countries: Australia, Canada, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States, where 10 of the studies occurred were reviewed.

Fourteen studies examined training programs that focused on serving alcohol responsibly by discussing alcohol service laws, recognizing the early signs of intoxication and using strategies for dealing with intoxicated customers.

"There weren't enough baseline studies to reach any conclusions based on the effectiveness of these interventions," DeGutis said. "What we do know is there's a need to continue to create interventions that would decrease those types of injuries."

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