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Fat cells lethally connected to heart disease

by Medindia Content Team on  April 17, 2006 at 6:52 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Fat cells lethally connected to heart disease
For the first time researchers have studied deeply about fat cells, called adipocytes which are close to the blood vessels in the heart .Research has now revealed that these Fat cells around coronary arteries , will be a key determiner of heart disease. University of Iowa researchers have revealed that fat cells release chemicals that can cause inflammation.
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Fat cells, once upon a time, were thought to have a role of nothing other than storing the excess fat tissue. Now, these fat cells, around the heart are now known to be pretty active releasing many chemicals that cause many negative changes in the body.

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The Iowa team has placed a finger on these fat cells which is known to release chemicals surrounding the coronary arteries that might have an important part in causing decline in the health of vessels. This carries a potential heart disease trigger. Fat cells may also cause formation of new blood vessels that could enhance the risk of cardiovascular disease by raising the risk of fatty deposits hemorrhaging and causing a dangerous blockage.

Lead researcher Dr Lynn Stoll said: "The fat cells surrounding coronary arteries may ultimately prove to be an important link between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery disease, all of which are increasing at epidemic rates. A better understanding of how epicardial adipocytes sense and respond to inflammation and ischemia could lead to new, rationally designed therapies for heart disease."

Professor Jeremy Pearson, associate medical director of the British Heart Foundation, said: "This is an interesting piece of research. It has been recognized for several years that fat cells stored up around the body secrete hormones that affect blood vessel function, but this is the first time that researchers have paid careful attention to fat cells lying close to blood vessels in the heart. Dr Stoll's results strongly suggest that these cells may be important regulators of blood vessel growth and repair that have previously gone unrecognized. They should be investigated further in future to better understand their role in the development of coronary heart disease."

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