Quick Recovery in Rodeo Athletes

by Medindia Content Team on  March 29, 2006 at 1:25 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Quick Recovery in Rodeo Athletes
Research conducted by the University of Alberta confirms the popular myth that Rodeo cowboys are a breed of their own.

In his research on whiplash injuries, Dr. Robert Ferrari, clinical professor at the Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, has found that conducted the cultural expectations of injury and the way we treat them plays an important role in the road to recovery. part of the problem.

Studies in association with Faculty of Agriculture of the University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry's Dr. Anthony Russell and Ashley Shannon, a Forestry and Home Economics student were conducted to differentiate between the outcomes of motor vehicle whiplash injuries on a group of rodeo athletes and a group of spectators at such events.

Their findings were unveiled at the Canadian Rheumatology Association meeting and published in the Journal of Rheumatology. 140 spectators who were mostly ranchers or farmers and 160 rodeo cowboys were the participants of the study. They were asked to relate previous motor vehicle collision experiences, the kind of vehicle they used, the resulting symptoms and their outcomes.

The studies revealed that rodeo athletes recover faster from their injuries with less time off from work in spite of the fact that they too shared similar occupations like ranching and farming as the spectators.

This fact could probably be attributed to the difference in the coping style of athletes, which is often lacking in most people.

The survey revealed that vehicle types and occupation types were similar for both sets of participants. However on an average the duration of symptoms was 30 days in rodeo athletes and 73 days in the spectators. Time off from work was at the most three weeks off from work for the rodeo athletes, whereas it was more than six weeks off for the spectators.

Ferrari concluded his study by proposing that there seemed to be minimal fear of pain with activity among the athletes unlike the common folk in Western Culture. And that by itself was sufficient reason to study athletes closely.


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