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Cardiologists Do Not Recommend Life Saving Diet To Patients

by Medindia Content Team on  February 22, 2006 at 10:31 AM Diet & Nutrition News   - G J E 4
Cardiologists Do Not Recommend Life Saving Diet To Patients
A new study conducted has revealed that although cardiologists are well informed about the possibility of reduction in heart surgeries and cardiac deaths as a consequence of eating vegetarian diet, they fail to recommend patients under an impression that they will not adhere to it.
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With this on one side, studies conducted on compliance of patients with respect to diet transition show that they are more than willing to adapt the low-fat diet, devoid of animal products and further rate it as being extremely good. The darker side of the issue is that if Cardiologist's awareness about the efficacy of vegetarian diet were equal to their knowledge, there would be fewer deaths and improved patient (cardiac) care.

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Nearly 91% of Cardiologists stated that there were familiar or somewhat familiar with the advantages of low fat, vegetarian diet, as revealed by the survey. The simplicity of cooking vegetarian diet and feasibility make the diet highly acceptable for people who find it hard to strike a balance between their work and family.

In spite of the above reasons, a lot of Cardiologists are still found to recommend the low fat, omnivorous diet that raised controversies about their effect on Women's health. The effect of this diet in the prevention of cardiac disease remains largely unexplored. A diet that excludes saturated fat (animal products) and contains fewer than 15% of calories from fat should be consumed to notice a dramatic improvement in their clinical condition.

'Patients hospitalized with life-threatening cardiac conditions should be advised by their doctor that they could head off another heart attack by switching to a low-fat vegetarian diet. Dietary changes reinforced by a doctor's recommendation will make it even easier for patients to make simple changes that could add years to their lives,' concluded Dr. Amy Joy Lanou, one of the senior researchers.

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