Malachite green adulteration in seafood exports

by Medindia Content Team on  November 27, 2005 at 11:55 AM Diet & Nutrition News   - G J E 4
Malachite green adulteration in seafood exports
Seafood industry of Asian countries is in the threat of ban on their export of seafood to Canada as a recent report of imported seafood from Asian countries had the banned chemical Malachite green in the fish tissues.

Critics feel that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency should follow strict stringent rules and should test all batches of imported seafood coming into the country for the presence of Malachite green and its byproducts. Consumer Association of Canada feels that the consumers should be aware of the risks of eating Malachite green.

Indian Export: Export Inspection Agency of India (EIA) is responsible for testing and surveillance of adulteration of seafood. EIA conducts monthly inspection of the aquaculture ponds and each batch of frozen seafood products before exporting to other countries. Malachite green and microbial contamination is tested by EIA laboratories before certifying the product for export.

Malachite green: Malachite green is an inexpensive and effective preservative which is used by fishermen for preservation of aquaculture products from contamination of fungus growth during storage and travel. Leucomalachite is the product of malachite green which persists in fish tissues for long periods. In 1992, the Canadian Government found that Malachite green may cause cancer in the consumers and ordered that seafood should not contain malachite green and even a very minimum quantity of malachite green in fish was considered as adulterated food.


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