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Blacks decline Lung cancer surgery

by Medindia Content Team on  November 8, 2005 at 8:06 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Blacks decline Lung cancer surgery
Professor Bruno DiGiovine and colleagues from Henry Ford Health system had found that Black colored people with lung cancer declined their interest to undergo lung cancer surgery at a comparatively higher rate than the white colored. The study found that the blacks were misinformed about the effects of lung cancer surgery and this misinformation had lead to the low rate of lung cancer surgery acceptance among blacks.
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Researchers compared the rates at which blacks and whites were offered and accepted surgery for stages I and II non-small cell lung cancer. Of the 97 blacks and 184 whites in the study, 74 percent of whites underwent surgical resection, compared with 58 percent of blacks. Within the two groups, 79 percent of whites was offered surgery, compared with 70 percent of blacks. Of those patients offered surgical resection, blacks were over three times more likely to decline surgery, with 18 percent of blacks and 5 percent of whites declining surgery.

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Surgery is very important at the early stage of Non-small cell lung cancer for effective treatment and surgery gives the most curative treatment for lung cancer. Most of the blacks were in the low socioeconomic status and they were mostly present with higher stage of cancer with Age was found to be an independent marker for patients who were more likely to decline surgery. There was no difference in sex, marital status, tumor histology, or comorbidities between the two groups. The low percentage of blacks undergoing surgery may lead to an increase death of blacks suffering from lung cancer.

W. Michael Alberts, President of the American College of Chest Physicians said, "Although cure rates are often disappointing, new treatments can extend survival and improve quality of life for patients with this disease, it is important for physicians to educate and advise their patients about lung cancer treatment options so that patients can make informed decisions about their course of treatment."

Source: News wise, Journal CHEST.
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