Early Lung cancer detected by studying Cheek Cells

by Medindia Content Team on  November 1, 2005 at 4:22 PM Cancer News   - G J E 4
Early Lung cancer detected by studying Cheek Cells
Dr. Bojana Turic and colleagues have found a new cheek cell analysis which detects early lung cancer. The research team has found a simple, inexpensive and early screening method for detecting lung cancer in patients with high risk for cancer using buccal mucosa or cells scraped from the inner part of the cheek which may contain information that separates patients with lung cancer from high-risk negatives from high risk positive patients. Early detection of lung cancer is required for effective and entire cure of lung cancer as Stage I lung cancer is curable whereas late stage lung cancer is very tough to get cured.

Cheek scrapings was collected from 150 confirmed lung cancer patients and 990 high-risk patients and the test was performed using a Automated Quantitative Cytometry which helps to detect subtle changes in buccal cell nuclei by detecting several thousand cells per specimen and reduces the data to a single score that predicts the likelihood of the presence of cancer. Of the total specimens collected the researchers found 66 percent sensitivity at 70 percent specificity for lung cancer detection. The new cheek buccal cell detection may not be useful for screening large population for detection of early lung cancer but can be useful in detection of lung cancer in patients with high risk of lung cancer.

Experts View:

The Research team head Bojana Turic, MD, Director of Clinical and Regulatory Affairs, Perceptronix, Inc, Vancouver, BC, Canada said, "Though the test will be very useful for detecting lung cancer in high risk individuals additional clinical testing of the method is needed, using a sufficient number and appropriate sample of patients in order to validate the test's performance and our earlier research work on studying the cell nuclear changes can extend a significant distance from the site of a malignancy and we have already conducted a successful clinical trial for our sputum test for lung cancer.

Mr. W. Michael Alberts, , President of the American College of Chest Physicians said, "Each year, great strides are made in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of lung cancer and with any new cancer screening or therapy, rigorous testing must be conducted in order to establish its safety and efficacy. Therefore, we must remain cautious but hopeful regarding new advances in their initial testing stages."

Source: News wise.

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