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Aspirin Benefits Cardiac Disease Patients, Even Before Surgery

by Medindia Content Team on  August 30, 2005 at 5:31 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
Aspirin Benefits Cardiac Disease Patients, Even Before Surgery
Research done by scientists from Mayo Clinic had reported that taking aspirin for cardiac patients is not only helpful, the benefits can still be had even hours before the surgery.
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Aspirin reduces clotting of the blood, so it can help prevent a heart attack or stroke by making it less likely a clot will form and block an already narrowed artery. However, many surgeons who are concerned about excessive bleeding due to inadequate clotting have advised their patients to stop taking aspirin in the days before their operation.

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The researchers collected data from 1,636 patients who had first-time coronary artery bypass surgery at Mayo Clinic in 2000, 2001 and 2002. Patients were divided into two groups: those who had taken aspirin within the five days before surgery (1,316 patients), and those who had not (320).

Characteristics of the two groups were similar, except patients in the aspirin group were more likely to have had a previous heart attack, while those not taking aspirin were more likely to be on dialysis. All members of both groups received aspirin therapy following surgery, starting six hours after their operation.

The in-hospital mortality for the aspirin group (1.7 percent) was significantly less than that for those not receiving aspirin (4.4 percent), and there was no increased risk of re-operation for excessive internal bleeding.

The study results suggest a reduction in strokes and related events, but the trend was not strong enough to be statistically significant.

This is a very strong association of survival with taking aspirin in the days leading up to surgery said the researcher. The study further confirms aspirin's benefits for patients with known cardiovascular disease. It also shows there is no increased risk of bleeding, which eliminates the main reason why physicians and surgeons would ask patients to discontinue aspirin therapy.

The findings are published this week in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Source: Newswise
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