Gene Variation Associated With Better Mobility For Older Individuals

by Medindia Content Team on  August 10, 2005 at 5:59 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
Gene Variation Associated With Better Mobility For Older Individuals
Research shows that elderly people who exercise regularly and have a certain gene variety have the tendency to have fewer problems in their movements than the people who lack the gene expression.

The research done by the scientists of Wake Forest University School of Medicine was published in the latest issue of JAMA.

Mobility limitation (i.e., difficulty walking and climbing steps) is common and is strongly related to major health outcomes, and may represent a stage in the disablement process amenable to intervention, according to background information in the article.

The people reporting such difficulty in walking are at nearly 4 times the risk of nursing home placement and 3 times the risk of death over 2 years compared with those reporting no difficulty. In older adults, more physical activity is consistently associated with less functional decline.

Despite exercise's general benefit, individual responses to exercise vary. The basis for this is unclear, but there appears to be a strong genetic component. A certain gene variation (an insertion [I]/deletion [D] polymorphism in intron 16 of the angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE]) gene has been identified as a potential marker for differential response to exercise in younger adults.

The Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Cohort Study, conducted in the metropolitan areas of Memphis, Tenn., and Pittsburgh, Pa., included 3,075 well-functioning community-dwelling adults aged 70 through 79 years. The participants were enrolled from 1997 to 1998 and had an average follow-up of 4.1 years. Mobility limitation, which 1,204 participants developed, was defined as difficulty walking a quarter of a mile or walking up 10 steps, as reported on 2 consecutive semi-annual interviews.

The researchers report that in older well-functioning men and women, a high level of physical activity was associated with the preservation of physical function. Although physical activity was associated with less mobility limitation for all ACE I/D genotypes, the improved risk benefit was significantly greater for those possessing the ID or DD genotypes compared with the II genotype. The physiological basis for these findings is uncertain. However, among the physically active participants, the II genotype was also associated with higher levels of total adiposity [body fat] and inter-muscular thigh fat.

Source: Newswise

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