Gene enchances radiation therapy - A novel approach to fight cancer

by Medindia Content Team on  August 14, 2001 at 6:14 PM Research News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

Gene enchances radiation therapy - A novel approach to fight cancer
In the era of fighting battle against cancer, researchers of Virginia have come out with a novel approach to execute the destiny. Radiation therapy is used to treat many types of cancer. An experimental form of gene therapy makes cancer cells more susceptible to radiation therapy.

Although radiation kills cancer cells, it has unwanted side effects that could counter its positive effects. Dr. Rupert K. Schmidt-Ullrich, of Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, and colleagues found that radiation activates the EGFR, or epidermal growth factor receptor, which is a part of a repair mechanism that can undo some of the destruction that radiation causes in cancer cells.

The researchers in their experiment injected the mice with mutant form of EGFR, called EGFR-CD533 that prevents the repair mechanism in cancer cells from being activated by radiation and then they irradiated them. They found that the mice that had received the gene therapy had a nearly threefold decrease in activation of the EGFR repair system. They also found that tumor cells in the mice treated with the mutant gene were 46% less likely to survive than those in untreated mice.

The study shows that disrupting the EGFR system in cancer cells "can enhance the effectiveness of radiotherapy, a major treatment form for many cancers," Schmidt-Ullrich said.

Drs. Stephen P. Ethier and Theodore S. Lawrence, of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor stated that such mutated gene therapy causing radiation boosting effects targeted against growth factor receptors offers an exciting potential advance in cancer treatment. This type of approach "offers the potential for a dramatic improvement in the outcome of treatment that, while not yet in our hands, is within our reach," they lamented. Hope this sooner gets into the application to humans to put an end to the cancer morbidiity and mortality.

Let us hope that future collaborations between the Yale and University of Pennsylvania research teams will result in further understanding the disease.

"This is the future of how we will come to understand the pathology of diabetes."


Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

More News on:

DNA Finger Printing Radiotherapy X-Ray Cancer and Homeopathy Hodgkins Lymphoma Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma Reiki and Pranic Healing Cancer Facts Cancer Radiation Hazards 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor
Advertisement

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive