Exposure to Pesticides in Schools Produces Illnesses Among Employees, Students

by Medindia Content Team on  July 27, 2005 at 12:20 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
Exposure to Pesticides in Schools Produces Illnesses Among Employees, Students
The number of school children getting affected by illnesses due to exposure to pesticides have increased significantly, from the figures of 1998 to 2002, reports a research in the recent issue of JAMA.

"Exposure to pesticides in the school environment is a health risk facing children and school employees," background information in the article states. Pesticides continue to be used both on and around school property, with some schools at risk of pesticide exposure from neighboring farms. Currently, no specific federal requirements on limiting pesticide exposures at schools exist. In the U.S. today, pesticide poisoning is often under diagnosed.

Walter A. Alarcon, M.D., from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, and colleagues examined 1998 - 2002 data from 2,593 people with acute pesticide-related illnesses associated with school exposure. Cases were included if illness developed after exposure to pesticide and illness was consistent with known toxicology of the pesticide.

The overall annual rates of new cases for 1998 - 2002 was 7.4 cases per million children, and was 27.3 cases per million school employee (adult) full-time equivalents. New case rates among children increased significantly from 1998 to 2002. Three cases (.1 percent) of high severity were found, 275 cases (11 percent) of moderate severity, and 2,315 cases (89 percent) of low severity were found. The majority of illnesses reported were associated with insecticides (n = 895, 35 percent), disinfectants (n = 830, 32 percent), repellents (n = 335, 13 percent), or herbicides (n = 279, 11 percent). Of 406 cases with detailed source information, 281 (69 percent) were associated with pesticides used at schools and 125 (31 percent) were associated with pesticide drift from farmland.

"These findings indicate that pesticide exposures at schools continue to produce acute illnesses among school employees and students in the United States, albeit mainly of low severity and with relatively low incidence rates," the authors write. "To prevent pesticide-related illnesses at schools, implementation of integrated pest management programs in schools, practices to reduce pesticide drift, and adoption of pesticide spray buffer zones around schools are recommended."

Source: Newswise

Medindia on Pesticide Exposure: Further information

Pesticide exposure: research reports have linked increased exposure to pesticides have harmful effects on human health. Some of the health conditions associated with exposure to pesticides are increased risks of breast cancer, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Pesticide exposure and children: Children are more prone to be at risk from unhealthy conditions arising out of low exposure to pesticides for long term. Toxicity of the pesticides can affect the organs, the nervous systems, the immune systems, and the fatty tissues of the body causing long-term damages. Also the behavior of the children makes them receive more exposure to pesticides than adults.

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