Statins Not Effective In Treating Calcific Aortic Stenosis

by Medindia Content Team on  July 1, 2005 at 7:56 PM General Health News
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Statins Not Effective In Treating Calcific Aortic Stenosis
Statins are known to successfully treat atherosclerosis, the narrowing of the arteries however researchers wanted to determine whether the drugs could also treat a similar condition called calcific aortic stenosis, the narrowing of the aortic valve in the heart.

According to a latest study done by researchers it was found that high doses of cholesterol-lowering drugs actually fail to treat calcific aortic stenosis. For the study researchers from the United Kingdom found that a high dose of 80 milligrams of atorvastatin (Lipitor) reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol but did not stop or slow down the disease of the heart valve. The study also showed that there was no relationship between the amount of LDL cholesterol and the way aortic stenosis progresses.

Currently, there are no effective treatments to slow or reverse the scarring and calcification process that leads to aortic valve stenosis, however researchers are hopeful that one day they would indeed find a solution

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