New ways developed to understand dyslexia

by Medindia Content Team on  May 30, 2005 at 4:37 PM General Health News
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New ways developed to understand dyslexia
Scientists said that the problem of inability to read in dyslexic children is not due to any deficit in visual processes as was thought in recent years. Instead, the dyslexic children may be suffering from problems of perception than anything else.
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Dyslexia is one type of specific learning disability. It commonly affects the children, who have difficulty in verbal skills, abstract reasoning, hand-eye coordination, concentration, perception, memory and social adjustment.

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Misinformation send by neurons are what causes the problems of perception in dyslexic children. They are unable to filter the sound and the sight from the 'noise' that seems to affect their ability to perceive correctly.

Using a new approach, researchers had tried to find out if the two types of visual sensations of dyslexic children are indeed affected, as claimed by previous studies. Their experiments with magnocellular (M) pathway that processes motion and brightness, and parvocellular (P) pathway that processes detail and color, have suggested that dyslexic children are equally proficient in understanding the sensations. Only when these sensations were disturbed partly with 'noise', the children struggled to identify the sources of the visual sensations. This proves that perceiving correctly is a problem for such children than seeing correctly.
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