Human immunity system can battle HIV.

by Medindia Content Team on  May 22, 2005 at 1:42 PM General Health News
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Human immunity system can battle HIV.
New research had showed that it is possible to use the human cells immune process to act on a part of HIVs genetic makeup.

This is for the first time scientists feel that it may be possible to target a part of HIV to destroy the virus in a novel HIV therapy. The process is called RNA silencing and is often a common phenomenon in plants and animals, only it was not known for humans.

The process, which works by RNA silencing, can ultimately destroy the RNA of the virus. The scientists of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US, it is possible to cause sequence specific RNA attack through cell mutation on the one of the HIV proteins called Tat. To protect itself HIV virus may need a virally encoded protein. Scientists feel that the protein Tat may be guarding a vulnerable genetic sequence of HIV that the virus cannot change even under attack.

Researchers opined that this novel siRNA sequence could lead to new RNAi-based drugs that HIV may not be able to resist by viral mutations.

The study will be seen in the printed form in the current issue of the journal Mutation.


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