People who fight wars may be at high risk of cardiovascular disease

by Medindia Content Team on  May 5, 2005 at 1:06 PM General Health News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

People who fight wars may be at high risk of cardiovascular disease
Men who have fought wars are more likely to have cardiovascular risks than men who didn't.

Men who have survived wars are more likely to be heavy drinkers of alcohol, heavy smokers of tobacco and with high tendency of becoming obese. War veterans are four times likely to be taken to drinking more than two pegs of alcohol a day than becoming never drinkers, and 1.6 times more likely to be heavy smokers than non-smokers.

The study was done to find out the effect of situations like war on the overall health of people. The results suggest that exposure to wars and combats may have long-term unfavorable effects on cardiovascular risks.

The study also emphasizes that going to a war increases the chances of obesity, as more people who have fought wars are obese than people who were enlisted but never fought any actual wars. These war veterans are also less likely to join managerial or professional occupations when compared to others.

The study as presented at the 45th annual Conference of Cardiovascular Disease, Epidemiology and Prevention, organized by the American Heart Association, US.

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive