Tobacco smoke increases the levels of Cox 2.

by Medindia Content Team on  April 25, 2005 at 11:40 AM General Health News
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Tobacco smoke increases the levels of Cox 2.
According to an article in the journal cancer Research, tobacco smoke have been linked with the rising levels of the chemical compound called Cox 2. Cox 2 is a cellular protein that had been related to onset and development of cancer. The tobacco smoke had also been related to rise in production of two proteins that start an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) function that can lead to the production of the chemical Cox 2.
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Scientists of the study had found out higher levels of Cox 2 in the oral mucosal cells of the mouth lining of the smokers than in people who are not smokers. This is mainly due to the induction effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is a protein related to the growth of various forms of cancer. Oral mucosal cells exposed to tobacco smoke produce more amphiregulin and TGF-a. Both of these chemicals are responsible for triggering EGFR functions.

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The researchers from Weill Medical College of Cornell University said that these findings are important for people as the biopsies of smokers' oral linings have produced the increased levels of these two proteins and these are taken as primary signs of cancer.
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