Traffic Smoke May Damage DNA

by Medindia Content Team on  March 30, 2005 at 12:11 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
Traffic Smoke May Damage DNA
In a study conducted by Department of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, of Taiwan, scientists have found that the traffic fumes inhaled during working at a toll station can damage the DNA of the persons inhaling the fumes.

The research studied 47 female highway toll station workers who were exposed to traffic fumes versus workers of an office setting. Using average and cumulative traffic density and a biomarker of exposure, the researchers found out workers being affected by oxidative DNA damage. They also measured plasma nitric oxide as an indicator to oxidative stress due to traffic exhaust exposure. The stress level was also high in these workers of the toll stations.

During the lifetime of a human being DNA receives potentially damage causing biological and chemical toxins from the environment. This may lead to cellular death or some other forms of distress like cancer and other diseases. Current DNA studies focus on the structure and the function of the DNA of the cells to understand the processes and suggest ways to control the damage.

The ability to control DNA damage varies from person to person and how to go about it may need extensive study regarding the genetic and nutritional information of the patients.

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