Fetal Cell Transplant Found To Improve Movement In Patients With Parkinsonís Disease

by Medindia Content Team on  March 2, 2005 at 12:06 PM General Health News
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Fetal Cell Transplant Found To Improve Movement In Patients With Parkinsonís Disease
Latest research shows that fetal cell transplantation for patients with Parkinson's disease is helping some patients get rid of their medications altogether.
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Parkinson's disease is a chronic neurological disease that impairs mobility. Patients with Parkinson's lack the chemical dopamine, which is necessary for movement. Fetal cell transplantation involves transplanting aborted human fetal tissue to replace the lost dopamine-producing cells to help restore movement.

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Levodopa (Dopar or Larodopa) is the gold standard treatment for Parkinson's disease. While the drug offers substantial relief, research shows it tends to lose its effectiveness after five to 10 years of use. Researchers say after one year, the transplant is equivalent to about 30-percent of the levodopa people take. After two years, it's equivalent to about 50 percent. By the third year, the procedure's effect is about 60 percent, or two-thirds, the effect of the drug and they say, that it is enough for some people to stop taking their drugs.
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